Goliad County Historical Markers

Texas Independence Trail Region

Map of Goliad County Historic Sites

Topics (click on a topic to jump to that section).
Becerra, Manuel | Cattle Drive from La Bahia | Battle of Coleto and Goliad Massacre | Site of Dobskyville | Site of Battle of El Perdido | Grave of Colonel J. W. Fannin and His Men | Goliad | Goliad County | Goliad County Courthouse | Hanging Tree | Site of September 1824 Indian Treaty | Mission Nuestra Senora del Espiritu Santo de Zuniga | Mission Nuestra Senora del Rosario | Presidio de Nuestra Senora de Loreto de la Bahia | Presidio La Bahia | Regulators of Goliad County | Santa Anna's Surrender Ratified | Replica of Texas Independence Flagpole | Zaragoza, General Ignacio

Museums
Manuel Becerra

Marker Title: Manuel Becerra
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 2001
Marker Location: Presidio La Bahia, 1.5 miles south of Goliad on US 183
Marker Text: Born at Presidio La Bahía del Espíritu Santo in 1762, Manuel Becerra played a significant role in the settlement and politics of the region. Becerra and his wife, Juana María Cadena, and their two daughters, María Josefa and Gertrudis, were leading citizens of La Bahía. In 1820, Antonio María Martínez, the last Spanish governor of Texas, called for the formation of the ayuntamiento of La Bahía as required in the Spanish Constitution of 1812. The ayuntamiento, or town council, included Manuel Becerra, who was elected its first secretary. Becerra's involvement with colonization efforts came the following year, as he was selected to accompany Stephen F. Austin to the Colorado River to find a suitable site for Austin's first colony. His friendship with empresario Martín de León led to his eventual responsibility within de León's Guadalupe Colony in 1827, when de León placed Becerra in charge of the colony's political and business affairs. The same year, Becerra helped negotiate a treaty with the Coco and Karankawa tribes to enhance peace and stability in the region. In 1832, Becerra received a land grant of 8,856 acres in what is now Refugio County and later assisted colonizer James Power in the colonization of the Power Colony at Villa de Refugio. As a citizen under the flags of Spain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas and the United States, Manuel Becerra bore witness to many of the formative events in Texas history and played a significant role in colonization efforts. He died in what is now Refugio County about 1849. (2001)

Cattle Drive from La Bahia

Marker Title: Cattle Drive from La Bahia
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1999
Marker Location: Goliad State Historical Park, 1/4 mi. S of Goliad on US 183/77A.
Marker Text: After Spain joined the American colonists in declaring war on England in 1779, Spanish soldier Bernardo de Galvez traveled to New Orleans to raise an army. Aware of the great number of wild cattle in Texas from his time spent stationed in the region, Galvez asked the Spanish governor of Texas to send cattle to feed his troops. As a result, about 10,000 head of cattle from Texas missions and ranches were assembled at Presidio La Bahia. Between 1779 and 1782, in what is believed to be the first major Texas cattle drive, cattle were herded from La Bahia to Spanish soldiers preparing to fight in the American revolution along the Gulf Coast. (1999).

Picture of General Sam Houston
General Sam Houston
Texas State Library and Archives Commission
Battle of Coleto and Goliad Massacre

Marker Title: Battle of Coleto and Goliad Massacre
City: Fannin
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1974
Marker Location: From Fannin, take FM 2508 south about 1 mile from US 59, and enter State Historical Park. Marker is on main circle.
Marker Text: After the fall of the Alamo, March 6, 1836, Colonel James Walker Fannin, with about 400 soldiers, mostly volunteers from the United States in the Texas War for Independence, was ordered by Texas General Sam Houston to retreat from Goliad to Victoria. March 19, the heavy Mexican force of General Urrea surrounded the withdrawing Texas contingent near Coleto Creek, and bitter fighting ensued. Fannin's volunteers hurled back the assaults of the Mexican force. On the following day, faced with several times their number, the Texans surrendered in the belief they would be treated as prisoners of war of a civilized nation. After removal to Goliad, the Fannin men were marched out and massacred on Palm Sunday under orders of Santa Anna, the general of the Mexican armies. Thus dictator Santa Anna added another infamy to that of the Alamo and gave to the men who saved Texas at San Jacinto their battle cry, "Remember the Alamo, Remember Goliad". The memorial to Fannin and his men is near Goliad. (1974)

Site of Dobskyville

Marker Title: Site of Dobskyville
Address: intersection of FM 884 and Dobskyville Rd.
City: Weesatche
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1994
Marker Location: 4 mi. N of Weesatches on FM 884, at the intersection with Dobskyville Rd.
Marker Text: After immigrating from Prussia to Texas in 1846, Fredrick and Auguste Wilhelmine Dobsky moved here with their family in 1847 to 800 acres they had bought from J. H. Davis. Following Fredrick's death in 1873 his son Adolph inherited the land. Adolph and his wife Rosalia farmed and ranched and reared a family here. After Adolph's death in 1903 Adolph's son Henry opened a general store, and a school was built nearby in 1906. Dobsky expanded his general store to include a post office, gristmill, blacksmith shop, gasoline pump, saloon and the only telephone exchange in the area. A dance pavilion that the Dobskys added to their roadside property in 1909 served for many years as the site of numerous popular entertainment activities. Residents of the area farmed and ranched and gathered socially in one of Henry Dobsky's several establishments. The town of Dobskyville gradually declined after the 1930s depression and World War II. The pavilion was destroyed by a storm in 1942, and in 1948 the school closed. Henry Dobsky, described as the "general merchant, mayor, marshall and city attorney of Dobskyville," died in 1957. In 1969 the Dobsky home was dismantled.

Site of Battle of El Perdido

Marker Title: Site of Battle of El Perdido
City: Fannin
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: From Fannin, take FM 2987 north about 1 mile.
Marker Text: During 1810 - 1819 efforts to expel Spain from Texas, a bloody clash occurred here on June 19, 1817, between the forces of Col. Antonio Martinez, last Spanish governor of Texas, and a Mexican Republican Army of invasion that was on its way to attack and capture La Bahia. Republicans had 42 men under Col. Henry Perry and Maj. James H. Gordon, former U.S. officers, veterans of the 1815 Battle of New Orleans. Outnumbered 3-to-1, Perry and Gordon refused offer of safe surrender, saying they would die first. Along with 24 of their men, both were killed. (1967)

Grave of Colonel J.W. Fannin and His Men

Marker Title: Grave of Colonel J.W. Fannin and His Men
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: From Goliad, take SH 183/77A south about 1 mile, then go east on Spur 71.
Marker Text: After battle of Coleto (March 19 - 20, 1836), where a Texas Army under Col. James Walker Fannin met defeat by Mexicans in superior numbers, the Texas soldiers were held in Presidio La Bahia, supposedly as war prisoners. However, by order of Mexican Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, approximately 400 of Fannin's men were marched out and massacred on Palm Sunday, March 27, 1836. The wounded were shot one by one in the fort compound. Col. Fannin was the last to die. Because of their profession, Drs. J. H. Barnard, J. E. Field and Jack Shackelford were spared; about 25 men were saved by a Mexican woman, "The Angel of Goliad". Approximately 30 escaped by feigning death or by swimming the San Antonio River. The Texans' corpses were stripped and partly burned, but left unburied. This atrocity three weeks after the fall of the Alamo gave Texans part of the battle cry--"Remember the Alamo! Remember La Bahia!"--under which decisive victory was won at San Jacinto on April 21, 1836. Gen. Thomas J. Rusk and the Texan Army afterwards marched here and gathered the bones of Fannin's men from the terrain. From Presidio La Bahia the remains were carried in procession to the grave, and there given a military funeral and burial on June 3, 1836. (1968)

Goliad

Marker Title: Goliad
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1965
Marker Location: Fannin Plaza, corner of Market Street and Franklin Street.
Marker Text: One of the three first Texas municipalities. Old Aranama Indian village called Santa Dorotea by the Spanish. Presidio La Bahia and Mission Espiritu de Zuniga established 1749. Here early events leading to the Texas Revolution were expeditions of Magee-Gutierrez, 1812; Henry Perry, 1817; James Long, 1821 Name changed Feb. 4, 1829, from La Bahia (the Bay) to Goliad. Honoring (in anagram) Mexican patriot (H)idalgo. Capt. George Collingsworth, Ben Milam and 48 men took Mexican garrison Oct. 8, 1835. Goliad Declaration of Independence signed Dec. 20, 1835, and Goliad flag unfurled. Defender Capt. Philip Dimmit succeeded by Col. James Walker Fannin, Feb. 7, 1836. On order of Gen. Sam Houston to evacuate Goliad, Fannin on Mar. 19, moved toward Victoria. Overtaken 9 miles out by a large Mexican army, Fannin and his men battled until night, surrendered next morning. From La Bahia Prison they were marched out, massacred and partially cremated on Palm Sunday, Mar. 27, 1836. After Texas won independence, Gen. Thomas Rusk's army gave them military rites and burial, June 1836. Goliad County Seat since 1836. Incorporated 1840 and built on present site. Received 4 leagues of land in grant signed by President Sam Houston, 1844. (1965)

Goliad County

Marker Title: Goliad County
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: from Goliad, take US 59 west about 4.5 miles to roadside park, north side of road.
Marker Text: First known to Spanish settlers as Nuestra Senora de Loreto, later called La Bahia del Espiritu Santo. Established as a mission in 1749. Became a strategic fort under Spanish, Mexican, Texas occupancy, 1810 - 1821, 1835 - 1836. Name changed to Goliad and created a Mexican municipality in 1829. Scene of massacre of Fannin and his command in 1836. Organized as a county, 1836, with town of Goliad as the county seat. Home of Confederate General Hamilton P. Bee. From population of 3,384 county sent several army companies to the Civil War.

Goliad County Courthouse

Marker Title: Goliad County Courthouse
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1964
Marker Location: Courthouse Square, S. Market Street, Goliad
Marker Text: Built 1894. Cost $67,888.95. Limestone and brick from 1870 courthouse were used in this, the fourth one built since county's creation in 1836. Used as hospital after 1902 cyclone. A 1942 storm tore off central clock tower. Enlarged in 1964. Preserving carved staircases, walnut wainscots. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1964.

Hanging Tree

Marker Title: Hanging Tree, The
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1964
Marker Location: Courthouse Square, S. Market Street, Goliad.
Marker Text: Site for court sessions at various times from 1846 to 1870. Capital sentences called for by the courts were carried out immediately, by means of a rope and a convenient limb. Hangings not called for by regular courts occurred here during the 1857 "cart war"--a series of attacks made by Texas freighters against Mexican drivers along the Indianola - Goliad - San Antonio Road. About 70 men were killed, some of them on this tree, before the war was halted by Texas Rangers. (1964)

Site of September 1824 Indian Treaty

Marker Title: Site of September 1824 Indian Treaty
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: MARKER MISSING; concrete base of marker remains, from Goliad, take US 59 east about 4 miles.
Marker Text: After finding bones of 2 men eaten by Karankawa Indians, Stephen F. Austin and 100 Texans met near here with a priest and men of La Bahia, where the Indians had taken refuge.The Indians were pledged to keep away from Texas Colony. Breaking of the treaty caused tribe later to be driven from Texas. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1967.

Mission Nuestra Senora del Espiritu Santo de Zuniga

Marker Title: Mission Nuestra Senora del Espiritu Santo de Zuniga
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: From Goliad, take US 183/77A south about 1 mile to Goliad State Park--on mission wall.
Marker Text: (Mission of Our Lady of the Holy Spirit of Zuniga) Founded in 1722 by the Aguayo Expedition on "La Bahia del Espiritu Santo" (the Bay of the Holy Spirit), present Lavaca Bay. This mission reflects its former site in the popular name, "La Bahia". Its formal name (in part) honored Baltasar de Zuniga, Viceroy of New Spain. Because of threats from the French and the Indians, Spain founded this mission and its auxiliary fort, Presidio Nuestra Senora de Loreto de la Bahia (now 1/4 mi. SE) to defend its territory and convert the natives. Difficulties, however, caused both to be moved, in only four years, to the Guadalupe River, and again in 1749 to this site, on the San Antonio River. At its peak of success the mission possessed huge herds of cattle and supplied settlements in Mexico, as well as missions in present Texas. In 1758 about 180 persons resided at the mission and fort. All about were Indian "jacales", crude clay-plastered brush huts thatched with grass. Spacious grazing lands and fertile fields surrounded the area, where colonists had formed a small community. After a general decline caused the mission to be secularized in 1830, it fell into ruin. In 1932, this land was deeded to the state by Goliad County. The mission complex was partially restored, 1936 - 1939. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark-1969

Mission Nuestra Senora del Rosario

Marker Title: Mission Nuestra Senora del Rosario
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: From Goliad, take US 59 West about 4 miles.
Marker Text: (Mission Our Lady of the Rosary) Founded in 1754 for the Cujane Indians. Capt. Manuel Ramirez de la Piszina, commander of nearby Presidio la Bahia, named this mission for his parish church in Spain, and Fray Juan Dios Camberos ministered to the first converts here. The Indians were taught crop-raising. In the years following, much livestock, including 30,000 head of cattle, belonged to Rosario. But these, along with Indian land at the mission, had to be surrendered later to the Spanish crown. In 1807 Rosario was permanently abandoned and its lands were distributed to Spanish settlers. (1969)

Presidio de Nuestra Senora de Loreto de la Bahia

Marker Title: Presidio de Nuestra Senora de Loreto de la Bahia
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: From Goliad, take US 183/77A south about 1 mile to Presidio Chapel entrance on Spur 71.
Marker Text: (Fort of Our Lady of Loreto of the Bay) One of the most historic Spanish forts in Texas. Popularly called Presidio la Bahia, it was founded on Espiritu Santo (present Lavaca) Bay in 1722. Twice moved, it was re-established here in 1749 to protect Espiritu Santo Mission (1/4 mi. NW). In the chapel is the statue of Our Lady of Loreto placed here in 1749. The turbulent history of this fort has often rung with the sound of revolution. Between 1812 and 1820 several irregular "filibustering" forces, including the Gutierrez-Magee Expedition and others led by James Long and Henry Perry, occupied or assailed the fort for various idealistic and profiteering motives. Here, too, 92 Texas citizens and soldiers drew up and signed Texas' first formal Declaration of Independence on December 20, 1835. In the ensuing War for Texas Independence, Col. James Fannin and 341 prisoners of war were held and, on Palm Sunday, 1836, were massacred in and around the fort by their Mexican captors. When the fort was authentically restored, 1963-67, by the Kathryn O'Connor Foundation, nine "levels of occupancy" were uncovered. Church services are now held in the chapel. The presidio has been named a registered National Historic Landmark. Recorded Teas Historic Landmark-1969

Presidio La Bahia

Museum Name: Presidio La Bahia
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 57
City: Goliad
Zip Code: 77963
Street Address: US Hwy 183 1.5 miles S of Goliad
Area Code: 512
Phone: 645-3752
County: Goliad
Types of Exhibits/Collections: Archeology, Historica

Regulators of Goliad County

Marker Title: Regulators of Goliad County
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1977
Marker Location: Courthouse Square, S. Market Street, Goliad.
Marker Text: When the Civil War ended in April 1865, many Texans returned to find their farms and ranches neglected, their cattle running wild and unbranded. The Federal troops sent to occupy Texas in June 1865 could not control the widespread cattle thieving and general lawlessness of the Reconstruction Period. Gen. J. J. Reynolds, commander of the Federal forces, appointed Jack Helm special marshal to the Goliad area in June 1868. A former deputy sheriff of DeWitt County, Helm captained a vigilante band of 50 men, mostly local ranchers, known as the Regulators. Based at Middletown (now Weesatche), these volunteers pursued criminals with vigor and often with cruelty. They ordered known and suspected lawbreakers to leave the state within 10 days. Those who defied the warning were shot without benefit of trial. In 1870 Helm was appointed by Gov. E. J. Davis to the newly formed state police force but was soon discharged for his ruthlessness. The activities of the Regulators and of the Texas Rangers, reorganized under Gov. Richard Coke in 1874, did much to restore order in this area. By 1876, most of the violators had left, and the Regulators were able to devote their time to ranching and farming. (1977)

Santa Anna's Surrender Ratified

Marker Title: Santa Anna's Surrender Ratified
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1970
Marker Location: Courthouse Square, S. Market Street, Goliad.
Marker Text: Gen. Vicente Filasola, Second in Command of Mexican armies in Texas War for Independence, fled from area of his nation's defeat at San Jacinto, April 21, 1836. Filasola's aim was to go back to Mexico with his army. After he had passed through Goliad, he was overtaken at Mujerero Creek (12 mi. SW) by Texan army couriers, Col. Ben Fort Smith and Capt. Henry Teal. Signing the ratification of peace at Mujerero, May 26, 1836, were Gen. Filasola, Gen. Eugene Tolsa, Col. Augustine Amat, Col. Smith, and Capt. Teal. (1970) Sponsored by Mr. and Ms. W. M. Neyland and heirs, W. E. and Mary Fitzgerald Neyland.

Replica of Texas Independence Flagpole

Marker Title: Replica of Texas Independence Flagpole
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: From Goliad, take US Highway 183/77A about 1 mile south to presidio chapel entrance, Spur 71--inside compound.
Marker Text: Displays a replica of banner unfurled Dec. 20, 1835, at signing of Declaration of Independence of Texas from tyranny of Santa Anna's regime in Mexico. That declaration, drafted by staunch early patriots Philip Dimitt and Ira Ingram, and signed by 92 citizens and soldiers, was later suppressed as premature, but it forecast coming events. A battle flag used 11 weeks earlier (and sometimes called "First Flag of Texas") lacked the support of a formal declaration of independence. The Goliad flag also waved over an army--one in possession of fort at La Bahia. Incise in base: Sponsored by W. M. Neyland, citizen of Goliad, 1968

General Ignacio Zaragoza

Marker Title: General Ignacio Zaragoza
City: Goliad
County: Goliad
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: From Goliad, take US 183/77A south about 1 mile to Goliad State Park.
Marker Text: (January 14, 1829 - September 8, 1862) Nacio en este lugar cuando se llamaba "Bahia del Espiritu Santo." En 1855, al mando de un ejercito de voluntarios Mexicanos, contribuyo a la derrota del dictador Santa Anna. Siempre fue caudillo en la defensa de su patria, el 5 de mayo de 1862, durante la invasion de las fuerzas Francesas de Napoleon III y Maximiliano, en la Batalla de Puebla y al Mando de 4,000 soldados mal armados, derroto a 8,000 zuavos veteranos Franceses. Esta heroica victoria dio a Mexico su gran fiesta patriotica nacional "El Cinco de Mayo." Born on this site when it was called "Bahia del Espiritu Santo." In 1855, at the head of an army of Mexican volunteers, contributed to the defeat of dictator Santa Anna. Always a leader in the defense of his country, on May 5, 1862, during the invasion of the French forces of Napoleon III and Maximilian, in the Battle of Puebla, he led 4,000 poorly armed soldiers to defeat 8,000 veteran French zouaves. This heroic victory gave Mexico its great national patriotic anniversary, "El Cinco de Mayo.


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