Burleson County Historical Markers

Texas Brazos Trail Region

Topics (click on a topic to jump to that section).
Broaddus, Andrew S., Judge | Burleson County | Burleson County | Burleson County, C.S.A. | Burleson County Czech Heritage Museum | Burleson County Historical Museum | Burleson County in the Texas War for Independence | Caldwell, City of | Caldwell, City of | Camino Real, Site of | Chisholm Cattle Trail, An Arm of | Chriesman, Horatio | Cooks Point | Fort Oldham | Fort Tenoxtitlan | Fort Tenoxtitlan | Somerville Historical Museum | Thomson, Alexander | Yegua Creek

Broaddus, Andrew S., Judge

Marker Title: Near Homesite of Judge Andrew S. Broaddus
City: Cooks Point
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1971
Marker Location: NE corner of SH 21 & FM 1362 intersection Cooks Point.
Marker Text
: Noted pioneer leader. Member Virginia House of Delegates (1844-45). Piloted to Texas (1854) a mile-long wagon train of 200 people, who built Salem Baptist Church-- reminder of their Virginia home. Broaddus debated the Hon. Sam Houston at Waugh Campground (8 Mi. W), 1857. He served in 1861 in Texas Secession Convention; 9th (1861-63) Texas Legislature; 13th Texas Legislature (1873); also on commission to locate and build Texas Agricultural & Mechanical College (now university); judge, 32nd District (1874-75; 1879-80). Married twice, had 13 children. (1971)

Burleson County

Marker Title: Burleson County
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: SE Corner (in traffic triangle) of the intersection of SH 21 & SH 36 Caldwell.
Marker Text: Farmed Early as 1744 by Indians under guidance of Spanish missionaries. In 1830, Ft. Tenoxtitlan, guarding Brazos crossing, San Antonio Road, attracted Anglo-Texans, who lived off wild game in early years. County created and organized in 1846. Named for Gen. Edward Burleson (1798-1851), veteran of Battle of San Jacinto; Indian fighter; Republic of Texas vice-president and senator, later a state senator. County seat, Caldwell (named for Mathew Caldwell, signer of Declaration of Independence). During the Civil War, furnished troops, cotton and food to Confederate Texas. (1965)

Burleson County

Marker Title: Burleson County
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1970
Marker Location: Courthouse Square Echols @ Buck St., Caldwell.
Marker Text: In rich Brazos River basin; had settlers early as 1825. Site in 1830 of Tenoxtitlan, one of 3 forts built by Mexico in Texas, situated above El Camino Real (The King's Highway) crossing on Brazos River. North of the road was Sterling Robertson's Colony; south, the colony of Stephen F. Austin. In 1840 on the Old Road, Civil Engineer George B. Erath (1813-1891) platted town of Caldwell, named for noted Indian fighter Mathew ("Old Paint") Caldwell. In 1846, Erath introduced in First Legislature of State of Texas a bill creating Burleson County out of land then in Milam and Washington counties. It was named for Gen. Edward Burleson (1793-1851), under whom many local men had fought in the Texas War for Independence and in Indian Wars. Gen. Burleson was a congressman, senator and vice president of the Republic of Texas; also was in first State Senate. Plantation system prevailed until Civil War (1861-1865). Burleson lost some area when Lee County was created in 1874. In 1880 the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railway built into county; soon afterward, Houston & Texas Central added more rail mileage. This is fourth courthouse for county. Economy is based on farming, oil, and miscellaneous products. (1970)

Burleson County C.S.A.

Marker Title: Burleson County C.S.A.
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: Courthouse Lawn Fox @ Main St. Caldwell.
Marker Text: On Feb. 23, 1861, citizens voted for secession, 422 to 84. On March 1, the "Burleson Guards" organized and offered its services to the state. Most "Guards" were mustered into Co.G, 2nd Texas Infantry Regt., and others served in Walker's Texas Division, Waul's Legion, Terry's Rangers, and Hood's Brigade. On the home front, the 3rd Regt., 18th Brigade, Texas State Troops, was organized to protect local citizens, and the County Commissioners Court provided funds to supply food and other necessities to the families of soldiers fighting in the war. (1973)

Burleson County Czech Heritage Museum

Museum Name: Burleson County Czech Heritage Museum
City: Caldwell
Zip Code: 77836
Street Address: 212 A W Buck
Area Code: 409
Phone: 535-4895
County: Burleson

Burleson County Historical Museum

Museum Name: Burleson County Historical Museum
Mailing Address: Courthouse
City: Caldwell
Zip Code: 77836
Street Address: 100 E Buck Street
Area Code: 409
Phone: 567-4226
County: Burleson

Burleson County in the Texas War for Independence

Marker Title: Early Settlers of Burleson County in the Texas War for Independence
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: Courthouse Lawn Main @ Fox St., Caldwell.
Marker Text: When Mexican Dictator Santa Anna revoked national rights, 30 or more men from this sparsely settled area left to resist his armies in Grass Fight (Nov. 26, 1835), Siege of Bexar (Dec. 5-9) and other actions. While able men were absent, the foe came within 40 miles of here, pillaging the country. Civilians fled over the swollen Brazos, toward safety in the United States. Their men on April 21, 1836, helped win Battle of San Jacinto and Independence. Some were in Regular Infantry Company A; Companies C, F, and H, 1st Regiment, and 4th Company, 2nd Regiment, Texas Volunteers. (1973)

Caldwell, City of

Marker Title: City of Caldwell
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: At Hill & Buck St. (N. E. Corner on Brick Bldg), Caldwell.
Marker Text: Founded 1840 by Lewis L. Chiles, a veteran of Battle of San Jacinto. Named for Mathew "Old Paint" Caldwell, Indian fighter and signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence. This was county seat, Milam County, in 1845; since 1846 county seat of Burleson County. Home, Burleson county fair. (1967)

Caldwell, City of

Marker Title: City of Caldwell
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1982
Marker Location: Courthouse Square Echols @ Buck St. Caldwell.
Marker Text: In 1840 the Republic of Texas Congress annexed to Milam County all of Washington County north of Yegua Creek and west of the Brazos River. The name Caldwell, which honored Mathew "Old Paint" Caldwell, a noted pioneer and a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, was chosen for a settlement that would become the seat of a future county. Following a land title dispute, this site was selected for the proposed town. Located on the Old San Antonio Road, it had been settled earlier by Virginia native Lewis L. Chiles, a veteran of the Battle of San Jacinto who had operated a trading post on Davidson Creek. George B. Erath platted the town of Caldwell in 1840. Streets running parallel to the Old San Antonio road were named for native animals and intersecting streets were named for the commissioners who had selected the townsite. When Burleson County was created six years later, Caldwell became the permanent seat of government. Incorporated in 1891, Caldwell developed as a major agricultural shipping center with the completion of area rail lines in 1890 and 1912. Since the 1840s the city has played a vital role in the region through its steady commercial growth and rich heritage. (1892)

Camino Real, Site of

Marker Title: Site of Camino Real
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: From Caldwell, take SH 21 about 9.4 mi. W. to marker in roadside park on S. side of road.
Marker Text: (The old San Antonio Road) Great thoroughfare of early Texas. Following ancient Indian and buffalo paths, sometimes on same course as 1691 "Trail of the Padres", stretches 1,000 miles from Saltillo, Mexico, to present Louisiana. Highway for explorers, traders, smugglers, adventurers, settlers and armies. Was surveyed about 1800 and given name of "King's Highway". Here, as in some other areas, the modern highway follows historic El Camino Real. Also, in this particular area, El Camino Real marked boundary between the major early 19th century colonies of Stephen F. Austin and Sterling C. Robertson. (1968)

Chisholm Cattle Trail, An Arm of the

Marker Title: An Arm of the Chisholm Cattle Trail
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Marker Location: From Caldwell, take SH 21 W about 8 mi to marker on N. side of road.
Marker Text: The Chisholm Trail, which was developed following the Civil War, allowed Texas cattle to be driven to railheads in Kansas for shipment to eastern markets. An arm of the celebrated route, reaching from Matagorda County to the main trail near present McGregor, passed through this area. With the establishment of James L. Dean's store, later the site of Deanville, and the White Inn, the trail became a significant commercial road. Vital to the development of Burleson County's cattle industry, it declined in use after rail lines reached the area in the late 1870s. (1981)

Chriesman, Horatio

Marker Title: Horatio Chriesman
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: Chriesman Cemetery - from Caldwell, take SH 36 NW about 6.2 mi. to CR 328, EO E about 1/2 mi. to cemetery.
Marker Text: Colonial statesman, Methodist lay leader, pioneer in Burleson County. Came to Texas in 1822 from Kentucky. Had office of surveyor, Austin's Colony, 1823-1836; was a military officer in Indian conflicts and also army of Gen. Sam Houston during Texas War for independence; in 1837 served on commission to choose site of Capital, Texas Republic. Married first Mary Kincheloe; after her death, Augusta Hope. He had eleven children. Recorded 1969.

Cooks Point

Marker Title: Cooks Point
City: Cooks Point
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: NE corner of SH 21 & FMM 1362 intersection Cooks Point.
Marker Text: Founded about 1840 where colonial road from southeast crossed San Antonio Road. Settler Gabriel Jackson had two-story log cabin-trading post here. Community was named for Silas L. Cooke, who surveyed much land in this vicinity. It is now a thriving rural village. (1969)

Fort Oldham

Marker Title: Fort Oldham
City: Cooks Point
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: On FM 1362 near intersection with CR 226 about 2.5 miles SW of Cooks Point.
Marker Text: Built 1836-37 by pioneers who took refuge with William Oldham (1798?-1868), Infantry major in Texas War for Independence. The fort stabilized the area, as dozens lived there in seasons of Indian raids, and eventually preachers who helped found early church. By 1838, Fort Oldham had a post office and was a stopping place on Independence-Tenoxtitlan Road. Maj. Oldham joined Somervell and Mier Expeditions (1842) to counter Mexican raids into Texas. Captured by the foe, he escaped, fought way through perils, and returned home. He amassed fortune in land surrounding fort site.

In the early part of May, Joseph Reed and Dr. Bigham were killed near William Oldham's home. The May 30th issue of Telegraph and Texas Register reported the fight.

Fort Tenoxtitlan

Marker Title: Fort Tenoxtitlan
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1970
Marker Location: From Caldwell take SH 21 E about 5 miles to roadside park on S side of road.
Marker Text: Founded by Mexico as a bulwark against Anglo-American immigration, this fort and its nearby city were twice proposed for the capital of Texas. Alarmed by the influx of Anglo settlers into Texas, Mexico in 1830 sought to erect a line of forts to keep out the intruders. The ancient Aztec name for Mexico City (originally pronounced "Tex-ox-teet-lan") was given this site; it means "prickly pear place". So hopeful of the fort's success was the military commandant of the region that he envisioned it as the capital of Texas. But Anglo immigration did not cease. Instead it thrived on the friendship of the local soldiers and incoming pioneers. The colonizer Sterling C. Robertson introduced scores of settlers. In 1832 the soldiers were withdrawn and the fort finally defaulted to the Anglos. Subsequently it was a supply center and mustering point for expeditions against the Indians. During its brief life many Texas patriots lived here, including 5 signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence, a martyr of the Alamo siege, and 7 soldiers of the Battle of San Jacinto. Tenoxtitlan was again suggested for the capital of Texas during the Republic, but Austin won out. In 1841, after many Indian raids, the site was abandoned.

Fort Tenoxtitlan

Marker Title: Fort Tenoxtitlan
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: From Caldwell take SH 21 E about 6 miles to FM 1362, go N. about 8 miles to CR 338, go E. about 1.5 miles to double gate - marker is about 1/2 mile S. across creek.
Marker Text: 2000 feet south, site of Fort Tenoxtitlan established by the Mexican government in July, 1830, in an attempt to stem Anglo-American settlement. Named in honor of the Aztec capital, now Mexico City. Abandoned by Mexican troops in 1832. In the town which grew up after 1834 many prominent Texans lived. The place passed from the map after 1860.

Somerville Historical Museum

Museum Name: Somerville Historical Museum
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 782
City: Somerville
Zip Code: 77879
Street Address: Ave. B - Corner of Hwy. 36 and 1361
Area Code: 409
Phone: 593-1604
County: Burleson

Alexander Thomson

Marker Title: Alexander Thomson
City: Caldwell
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1972
Marker Text: (August 29, 1785 - June 1, 1863) A leader in colonizing Texas. Born in St. Matthew's Parish, S. C.; lived also in Georgia, then in Tennessee where in 1830 he became partner of the Empresario in development of the Sterling C. Robertson Colony. Conducting a number of families who had signed agreements to settle in the Robertson Colony, he crossed into Texas and came to Nacogdoches three days after Mexican officials there received notice of 1830 law requiring passports of immigrants. After Thomson tried unsuccessfully to have rule waived for hardship reasons, the party bypassed Nacogdoches, making a new trail often used afterward and known as the Tennesseans' Road. Thomson lived for a time in Austin's Colony, representing District of Hidalgo (now Washington County) at Texas Convention of 1832. By 1835, when he was Consultation Delegate from Viesca (later Milam Municipality), he was living and serving as official surveyor in Robertson's Colony. Still a leader, he was Robertson's executor in 1842. Married twice, father of 13, he was ancestor of many noted Texans, including Thaddeus A. Thomson, United States envoy to Colombia and signer of the Thomson-Urrutia Treaty in 1914. Alexander Thomson is buried in Thomson Family Cemetery one mile to the northeast.

Yegua Creek

Marker Title: Yegua Creek
City: Somerville
County: Burleson
Year Marker Erected: 1976
Marker Location: On SH 36, just S of Somerville, in roadside park on W side of 36 .
Marker Text: In 1690 the Spanish gave the name "San Francisco" to this 62-mile Brazos River tributary; but on an 1822 map, Stephen F. Austin, "Father of Texas", marked it "Yegua", Spanish for "mare". Mustang mares and foals then grazed among the Indians on the timbered creek. In 1826, colonist John P. Coles built a mill on the stream. A measure signed in 1837 by Texas President Sam Houston made the Yegua a county boundary. Floods often devastated the area until Lake Somerville harnessed Yegua's waters in 1967. Now a recreation area, the lake and creek benefit crops, wild life, and vacationers.


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