Bexar County Historical Markers

Texas Hill Country Trail Region
Southern Texas Map
Museums
Numbers 12-14
13-Alazan, Battle of the | 13-Arsenal Magazine | 13-Austin, Camp of Stephen F. | 13-Austin, Moses | 13-Bee, Hamilton P. | 13-Bexar County Under Nine Governments | 13-Bexar, Storming of | 13-Bolivar Hall | 13-Canary Islanders | 13-Casa Navarro State Historical Park | 13-Casas Reales | 13-Casino Club | 13-Coker, John "Jack" | 13-Confederate Cemetery | 13-Dawson Massacre | 13-El Camino Real | 13-El Quartel | 13-Esparza, Enrique | 13-Ford, John Salmon "Rip" | 14-Gallagher Ranch | 13-Goliad Road | 13-Hall, Captain Lee | 13-History and Traditions Museum | 13-Houston Museum and National Historic Landmark, Fort Sam | 13-Institute of Texas Cultures | 13-Lapham, Moses | 13-Lone Star Buckhorn Museum | 13-Matamoros Road | 13-Maverick, Samuel Augustos | 13-Menger Hotel | 13-Milam, Benjamin Rush | 13-Miles, Colonel Edward | 13-Pajalache Acequia | 12-Piedras, La Quinta de las | 13-Plaza De Armas | 13-Rosalis, Battle of | 13-Salado, Battle of the | 13-San Antonio Missions National Historical Park | 13-San Francisco Xavier de Najera, Mission | 13-Seguin, Erasmo | 13-Smith, Jefferson Davis | 13-Smith, John W. | 13-Spanish Governor's Palace | 13-Texas Pioneer, Trail Driver and Texas Ranger Museum | 13-Twiggs, General David E. | 13-Woll Invasion | 13-Ximenes, Don Juan
Missions
Alamo | Fort Sam Houston | Fort Sam Houston Museum | Mission San Francisco de la Espada | Mission San Jose | Mission San Juan Capistrano | San Fernando Cathedral
Uncommemorated and Unmapped Sites
Captain Cage's Fight on Leon Creek | Council House Fight

Frederick Law Olmsted, famed architect of Central Park, gives his first hand description of San Antonio around 1856 from his book A Journey Through Texas.

12-La Quinta de las Piedras

Marker Title: La Quinta de las Piedras (Miguel Menchaca House)
Address: 19801 Scenic Loop Rd.
City: Helotes
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1965
Marker Text: Home of Miguel Menchaca, descendant of prominent Canary Islanders who came to Texas 1731. Stone villa built in 1850's. In its thick rock walls are "gun-slits" for observation, defense. Spring under house supplied water in times of siege. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1965.

13-Arsenal Magazine

Marker Title: Arsenal Magazine
Address: 646 S. Main
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1977
Marker Text: At the urging of United States Secretary of War Jefferson Davis, land was secured at San Antonio in 1858 for an arsenal. In 1859, the State of Texas added 16 acres, and the arsenal became headquarters for the U.S. Army's department of Texas. Under construction when the Civil War (1861-65) began, this magazine was included in Federal property surrendered in 1861. The building was completed for Confederate Texas by local contractor J.H. Kampmann. Carefully spaced vents and cavities in the walls permitted air circulation and reduced the danger of sparks igniting stored gunpowder. The arsenal supplied arms for south Texas and frontier defense, as well as the Sibley expedition to New Mexico in 1862. Reoccupied by Federal forces in 1865, this became the principal supply depot for the line of Forts defending frontier settlements. It served the U.S. Army until 1947, when the Arsenal was closed. The long, narrow one-story structure features walls of extremely thick ashlar limestone construction. Details include end gables extended above the roofline, lintels which protrude as hood molds, and date stone in relief over the side entry.

13-Moses Austin

Marker Title: Moses Austin
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: City Hall, Military Plaza, San Antonio
Marker Text: (Front) Born in Connecticut, October fourth 1761; moved to Philadephia in 1783. Thence to Virginia in 1785 and to Missouri in San Antonio on December 23, 1820. Died in Missouri June 10, 1821. (Right) Moses Austin here petitioned the Spanish authorties for the right to bring three-hundred families to Texas and returned to MIssouri to wait the answer. (Back) Exposure and exhaustion during his Texas journey caused his death a few days after receiving notification that his petition had been granted. His dying request was that his son Stephen should carry out his vision. (Left) A man of vision, enterprise, industry and indomitable energy...he most fittingly bequeathed the realization of his plans to his more deliberate, patient, tactful and diplomatic son. (1936)

13-Camp of Stephen F. Austin

Marker Title: Camp of Stephen F. Austin
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: US 87, Rigsby St., at front of Camanche Park, San Antonio
Marker Text: Site of the camp of Stephen F. Austin (October 20-226, 1835) while assembling troops preparatory to the attack on the Mexican garrison at San Antonio. After his appointment on November 12 as Commissioner to the United States, the Texans, under Colonels Ben Milam and Frank W. Johnson stormed and captured San Antonio, December 10, 1835. (1936)

13-Battle of Rosalis

Marker Title: Battle of Rosalis
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: SW Corner of W. W. White & Hilderbrandt roads, San Antonio
Marker Text: In this vicinity the Battle of Rosalis was fought on March 28, 1813. Here the "Republican Army of the North" composed of Anglo-Americans, Mexicans and Indians defeated, with heavy loss of life, Spanish Royalists troops commanded by Manuel de Salcedo, Governor of Texas. The prisoners of war were brutally murdered shortly afterwards by order of Colonel Bernardo Gutierrez. (1936)

13-Battle of the Alazan

Marker Title: Battle of the Alazan
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: 2300 W. Commerce, San Antonio
Marker Text: Fought in this vicinity June 20, 1813. One in chain of clashes between Spanish Royalists and insurgent elements in Coahuila and Texas, 1811-1813. Col. Ygnacio Elizondo was ordered to lead his Spanish Royalists force to Frio River -- but no further. Instead, the colonel, having changed sides twice since opening of hostilities in 1810 and wanting to redeem his honor by reconquering province of Texas for Spanish rule, came to the outskirts of San Antonio some 500 yards west of the Alazan. Underestimating enemy ability, he pitched camp without precaution, neglected to post scouts for pickets. Only 2 bastions of 6 artillery pieces protected camp. Women, children were allowed to mingle with troops. The republican army of the north was in position about camp at sunrise; bounty-collecting Indians were waiting to chase, capture, scalp runaway troops. Then, while Elizondo's men were at Mass, the 2-hour battle began. With a solid green banner for flag, the insurgent leader, Bernardo Gutierrez de Lara, led his men through the very center of Spanish camp. Only those mounted on fleet horses escaped. Elizondo, who had 2 horses shot from under him, managed to catch up with remnants of his army some 15 miles from the battlefield as they hurried to the Rio Grande (1967)

13-Battle of the Salado

Marker Title: Battle of the Salado
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: 1006 Holbrook, San Antonio
Marker Text: The Battle of the Salado, decisive in Texas history, was fought here September 18, 1842. Col. Mathew Caldwell and Capt. John C. Hays, commanding a force of Texas volunteers, opposed the Mexican Army under General Adrian Woll that had captured San Antonio, and with the loss of only one man, checked the last Mexican invasion of Texas and thereby prevented the capture of Austin, capital of the Republic of Texas. (1936)

13-Hamilton P. Bee

Marker Title: Hamilton P. Bee
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1963
Marker Location: City Cemetery #4, intersection of E. Commerce St., & JEB Stuart Way, San Antonio.
Marker Text: Secretary 1st Texas Senate, Legislator 1849. Speaker of House 1854-1856. Served campaigns against Comanches. Lieutenant, Cavalry, Mexican War 1846. Confederate presidential elector 1861. Brigadier General State Militia 1861. Appointed same rank Confederate Army 1862. In command Western District, Texas, keeping vital cotton road open to Mexico. Led brigade and wounded Red River Campaign 1864 to stop invasion Texas. Served Indian Territory to keep Indians and Federals in check. Returned to command cavalry division in Texas. (1963)

13-Bexar County Under Nine Governments

Marker Title: Bexar County under Nine Governments
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: Courthouse grounds, faces entrance at bottom of steps, south main & Nueva streets, San Antonio.
Marker Text: The administrative government of Bexar County, besides being the oldest in Texas, is distinguished by having served under nine governments. The community served under Spanish rule from May, 1718, until January, 1811, when it was taken over by the revolutionary "Casas regime". Only five weeks later, the "counter-revoluationary Junta of Bexar" overthrew the Casas government and eventually restored Spanish rule. In April, 1812, however, the "Republican Army of the North" deposed the provincial Spanish government and declared independence from Spain. Five months later the Spanish regained control, holding Texas until 1821. The fifth regime, "First Imperial Government of Mexico" was created when Mexico gained independence from Spain in 1821. The emperor relinquished control to army leaders within two years, however, and the "Republic of Mexico" was established. Texas gained independence from Mexico in 1836, thereby establishing Bexar's seventh government, the "Republic of Texas". In 1845, Texas became the twenty-eighth state of the United States and remained in the Union until 1861, when the southern states seceeded to from the Confederacy. Following the Civil War, U.S. rule returned to Bexar County in 1865. (1967)

13-Bolivar Hall

Museum Name: Bolivar Hall
Mailing Address: 418 Villita
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78205
Area Code: 210
Phone: 224-5711
County: Bexar

13-Canary Islanders

Marker Title: Canary Islanders
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1971
Marker Location: Main Plaza, NW Corner of courthouse lawn, San Antonio
Marker Text: Earliest civilian colonists of San Antonio, this nucleus of pioneers from the Canary Islands formed the first organized civil government in Texas and founded the village of San Fernando de Bexar in 1731. Following a sea and land voyage of over a year, these weary travelers arrived at the Presidio (Fort) of San Antonio early on March 9, 1731. Totaling 56 persons, they had emigrated to Texas from the Spanish Canary Islands near Africa, by order of King Philip V. On July 2, they began to lay out a villa (village), choosing a site on the west side of the Plaza de las Islas (present Main Plaza) for the church and a site on the east side for the Casa Reales (government building). On July 9, the captain of the Presidio, Juan Antonio De Almazan, read to the islanders the decee of the viceroy naming them and their descendatns "Hijos Dalgos", persons of nobility. The heads of the 16 families who settled in San Antonio were: Juan Leal Goraz, Juan Curbelo, Juan Leal, Antonio Santos, Jose Padron, Manuel De Nis, Vicente Alvarez Travieso, Salvador Rodriguez, Jose Leal, Juan Delgado, Jose Cabrera, Juan Rodriguez Grandillo, Francisco De Arocha, Antonio Rodriguez, Lorenzo and Martin De Armas, and Felipe and Jose Antonio Perez. (1971)

13-Casa Navarro State Historical Park

Museum Name: Casa Navarro State Historical Park
Mailing Address: 228 S. Laredo St
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78207
Area Code: 210
Phone: 226-4801
County: Bexar

13-Casas Reales

Marker Title: Casas Reales
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1971
Marker Location: Main Plaza, San Antonio (faces Markert St.)
Marker Text: On site chosen July 2, 1731, for "government houses" by people of San Fernando de Bexar, including newly-arrived settlers from the Canary Islands. Structure, erected 1742, had to be rebuilt in 1779 by Don Jose Antonio Curbelo, alcalde of the Villa San Fernando de Bexar. A jail was erected to the south in 1783. From commanding position of Casas Reales on Main Plaza were read official proclamations, to the roll of drums. A noted visitor in 1807 was Lt. Zebulon M. Pike, freed after arrest on upper Rio Grande while exploring Louisiana Purchase for the United States. Briefly in 1813 over the Cases Reales flew the green flag of the rebel Republican Army of the North, formed to free Mexico from Spain's rule. Aided by the Baron de Bastrop, Moses Austin in December 1820 initiated the Anglo-American colonization of Texas by filing his petition and plans with the governor and cabildo (council) in Casas Reales. Santa Anna arrived here February 23, 1836, to press the siege of the Alamo. The bloody "Council House Fight" between Texian leaders and Comanche chiefs occurred here on March 19, 1840. The building served as municipal headquarters under Spanish, Mexican, Republic of Texas, and American regimes, but were vacated in 1850 by the city. (1971)

13-Casino Club

Marker Title: Casino Club
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1965
Marker Location: Directly east of the library on West Market St., San Antonio
Marker Text: Property of Casino Association, organized 1853 among cultured German settlers. Clubhouse and opera building, erected 1858, had a theater; a hall seating 700; banquet rooms; club rooms. Setting during Civil War for military balls, entertainment, suppers; tableaux, concerts and minstrel shows to benefit the Confederate cause; and meetings of ladies to roll bandages. The owners obtained the best artists of the day to perform here. In the 1850s one noted guest was Col. Robert E. Lee. Later audiences included Gen. U. S. Grant and Buffalo Bill. (1965)

13-John "Jack" Coker

Marker Title: John "Jack" Coker
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: SE corner of Coker Cemetery, at Coker United Methodist Church, 231 E. Worth loop Rd. on West side of US Hwy. 281, San Antonio.
Marker Text: (May 10, 1789-Jan. 4, 1861) Came from South Carolina to Texas in 1834. Served in Battle of San Jacinto in Texas War for Independence, 1836. Was one of a party with "Deaf" Smith that destroyed Vince's Bridge near Pasadena. This deed may have kept Santa Anna's army from retreat or reinforcement, thus insuring Texas victory. In recognition, the Legislature of Texas awarded to Coker 1,920 acres, where he and his brother Joseph founded Coker community. (1968)

A visitor to our site states that the address for this is incorrect. It should be 231 W. North Loop Rd. Thanks, Grady, for the correction.

13-Confederate Cemetery

Marker Title: Confederate Cemetery
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1989
Marker Location: Inset into Cemetery #4 off of E. commerce, Paso Hondo & News Braunfels Streets, San Antonio.
Marker Text: This cemetery is located within part of a 40-acre grant of land given to the city of San Antonio by the King of Spain. The property was later subdivided into twenty-nine separate cemeteries by City Adlermen, and this area was designated as City Cemtery Number Four. This section became known as the Confederate Cemetery after its purchase in 1885 by the Albert Sidney Johnston Camp No. 1, United Confederate Veterans. The earliest documeted burial in this plot, that of Charles Hutcheson, dates to 1855 and was already in place a the time of the Camp's purchase. Prominent Confederate veterans interred here include John Salmon "Rip" Ford, the pioneer Texas politcal leader and newspaper editor famous for his service as a Texas Ranger; George Wythe Baylor, a politcal and military leader; and Hamilton P. Bee, Confederate General and Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives. There are over 900 marked burials in the Confederate Cemetery, including those of Civil War veterans, their dependents, and later generations of descendants. Also interred here are veterans of World War I and World War II.

13-Dawson Massacre

Marker Title: Dawson Massacre
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: At intersection of Corrine St. & Old Austin Hwy. (W. side of Rd.)
Marker Text: Occurred in this vicinity on September 18, 1842 when Captain Nicholas Mosby Dawson and 53 men from La Grange, in attempting to join Captain Mathew Caldwell (Old Paint) and his company of Texas Volunteers during the Battle of the Salado, were surrounded by Mexican Forces and 36 slain. 15 were taken prisoners, only 3 escaped.

13-El Camino Real

Marker Title: Route of El Camino Real
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1979
Marker Location: On post in front of Guaranty Federal Bank, S.W. Corner of Hwy 410 & Nacogdoches in parking lot.
Marker Text: The main thoroughfare of early Texas, The Camino Real,or "King's Highway", followed ancient Indian and buffalo trail. It stretched 1,000 miles from Mexico to present Louisiana. Domingo Teran de los Rios, first Governor of Texas, blessed the central section of the road in 1691. Called the "Trail of the Padres", it linked Monclova, Mexico, with the Spanish Missions of East Texas. Over the centuries, priests, soldiers, traders, and settlers used the Camino Real. The French adventurer T. Denis probably traveled the road from Louisiana to the Rio Grande in 1714. San Antonio was a major stop on this frontier highway. Moses Austin followed the Camino Real to San Antonio in 1820 seeking colonization rights from Spain. Many Anglo-American settlers called it the "old San Antonio Road". It joined this city with Nacogdoches, San Augustine, and other East Texas Settlements. In 1915 the Texas Legislature appropriated $5,000 to mark the historic roadway across the state. The Daughters of the American Revolution, along with other patriotic groups, endorsed the project. V.N. Zivley surveyed the route and indicated the spacing for granite markers every five miles. Today many modern highways follow the path of the Camino Real.

13-El Quartel

Marker Title: El Quartel (El Cuartel)
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: 401 S. Alamo, San Antonio, voc. in parking circle to plaza San Antonio Hotel.
Marker Text: Built in 1810, on Jan. 22, 1811, Captain Juan Bautista De Las Casas recruited forces here for first overthrow of Spanish rule in Texas by arresting Governor, and other high officials. On March 2, 1811, Juan Zambrano led counter revolutionary force, also recurited here, to overthrow Casas Regime, restore Spanish Rule. Early in 1813, province invaded by Republican Army of the North favoring independence from Spain, only to be reconquered that year. Quartel de San Antonio de Bexar apparently destroyed during Texas Revolution as the defenders chose to make their stand at the Alamo.

13-Enrique Esparza

Marker Title: Enrique Esparza (September, 1824-December 20, 1917)
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: In Cemetery, MT. Carmel Catholic Church, corner of Leal Rd & Martinez, Laysoy.
Marker Text: Son of Alamo defender Gregorio Esparaza, 11-year old Enrique, his mother, two brothers, and sister were present at the seige by the Mexican Army (Feb. 23-Mar. 6, 1836). Hidden in a pile of hay, the youth saw his father fall and witnessed the heroic death of James Bowie on his sick bed. He then watched the bodies of the Texans burn in two huge Pyres. Enrique Esparza's eyewitness story later became invaluable, for he was one of few survivors.

13-John Salmon "Rip" Ford
Rip Ford Picture
"Rip" Ford
Photo from the book, Texas Ranger Tales II, by Mike Cox

Marker Title: John Salmon "Rip" Ford
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1963
Marker Location: In Confederate Cemetery, Loc. inside of City Cem. #4, at intersection of E. Commerce St. Jeb Stuart Way., San Antonio.
Marker Text: Here Rests in Peace--John Salmon ("Rip") Ford May 26, 1815- November 3, 1897. Native South Carolinian, Pioneer doctor and editor, Republic of Texas Congressman, twice state Senator, Jack Hay's adjutant in war with Mexico, fearless Ranger Captain in border and Indian campaigns, Confederate colonel, Mayor of Austin and Brownsville, member Constitutional Convention of 1875, superintendent State Deaf and Dumb School, charter member of Texas State Historical Association. As war maker and as peace keeper, he was steadfast and true to his motto: "Ready, ay, ready!" Erected by the State of Texas, 1963.

13-Fort Sam Houston Museum and National Historic Landmark

Museum Name: Fort Sam Houston Museum and National Historic Landmark
Mailing Address: 1207 Stanley Road
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78234
Area Code: 210
Phone: 221-1886
County: Bexar

13-Goliad Road

Marker Title: Goliad Road
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: Tee #13 on Golf Course (at Pecan Valley Golf Course), Pecan Rd., San Antonio.
Marker Text: Established about 1720 by Spain as "El Camino Real a La Bahia del Espiritu Santo" ("King's Highway to Goliad"). Served for 150 years as a major emigrant, military, and trade road. Became segment of the Chihuahua Road, which connected the Texas Gulf Coast and Mexico. Indians, soldiers from Spain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, the United States and Confederacy used road for their campaigns. In this vicinity the Goliad Road crossed Salado Creek and paralleled the Gonzales Road in the approach to San Antonio. Its traffic diminished only after railroads came to Texas.

13-Captain Lee Hall

Marker Title: Captain Lee Hall
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1970
Marker Location: Old National Cemetery, between Paso Hondo and Center St., San Antonio (Center Island S. of Flagpole)
Marker Text: Captain Lee Hall (October 9, 1849-March 17, 1911) Heroic defender of honor of Texas and the United States. Born in Lexington, N.C., came to Texas in 1869. Gained national fame as Grayson County Marshal and Deputy Sheriff, 1871, 1876. Served with frontier battalion, Texas Rangers, 1876-1880, hunting such outlaws as Sam Bass, King Fisher, John Wesley Hardin, and feuding Taylor-Sutton gangs. In Spanish-American War (1898-1900), was cited for his gallant service in the Philippines. Recorded-1970.

13-History and Traditions Museum

Museum Name: History and Traditions Museum
Mailing Address: 37 LG/LGMH
Street Address: 2051 George Ave.
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78236-5218
Area Code: 210
Phone: 671-3055
County: Bexar

13-Institute of Texan Cultures

Museum Name: Institute of Texan Cultures
Mailing Address: 801 S. Bowie St.
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78205 3296
Area Code: 210
Phone: 458-2300
County: Bexar

13-Moses Lapham

Marker Title: Moses Lapham
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: At Leon Creek, on old Castrouville Rd. (hwy 90 acccess rd.)1 mi of Acme Rd., San Antonio Southwest.
Marker Text: Near here on October 20, 1838 Moses Lapham, a veteran of San Jacinto, and three of his companions were killed by Indians, as were seven members of a rescue party on the following day. More

13-Lone Star Buckhorn Museum

Museum Name: Lone Star Buckhorn Museums
Mailing Address: 600 Lone Star Blvd.
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78204
Area Code: 210
Phone: 270-9469
County: Bexar

13-Matamoros Road

Marker Title: Matamoros Road
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1965
Marker Location: At intersection of Ashley, Roosevelt & S. Flores Rds., San Antonio
Marker Text: Near this site, used by Indians and the Spanish before 19th century Anglo-American settlement of Texas. Path of Armies, Missionaries and commerce. About 330 miles long, the route varied with seasons, depending on chances to water teams pulling wagons or carts. Driest stretch was from the Nueces to the Rio Grande. The trip from San Antonio to Matamoros took 6 to 8 weeks, even when delays did not occur. Bandits were an added danger. Slow-moving wagon trains attracted robbers on fast horses. Teamsters learned to hide money in bags of grain or potatoes. They would even bore holes in cart axles, put gold in, plug each hole, cover the spot with black grease. During the Civil War, this was main artery of the cotton road, lifeline of the Confederacy. Wisps of cotton road, lifeline of the Confederacy. Wisps of cotton thorned into Mesquite trees marked its way. A 6-mule wagon would haul up to 12 bales of cotton. A solid-wheel mexican cart drawn by 10 oxen hauled up to 16 bales. When teams grew exhausted, bales of cotton would be thrown off and hidden, so that the teamster might pick them up later. In extremely hot, dry weather, the way would be lined with discards. Returning wagons brought guns, ammunition, cloth and other goods so much needed by the Confederacy.

13-Samuel Augustos Maverick

Marker Title: Home of Samuel Augustos Maverick
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: 105 N. Alamo St., San Antonio
Marker Text: A native of South Carolina; came to San Antonio in 1835; was guide for Ben Mailam and other leaders in first attack on San Antonio by Texas Army, Dec. 1835. As Bexar Delegate, Maverick signed Texas declaration of Independence at Washington-on-Brazos, 1836. With Capt. Jack Hays' "Minute Men," he helped make San Antonio safe from Comanche Indian attacks; also joined Hays' expedition which opened California road and claimed Rio Grande as Texas' western boundary. Twice Mayor of San Antonio; he was prisoner-of-war in Perote, Mex., or 7 months after Gen. Adrian Woll's capture of San Antonio in 1842. Was elected as Bexar representative to 7th congress of republic (1842) while still a prisoner at Perote. Member of committee which accepted surrender of U.s. troops and Forts in Texas without bloodshed in Civil War, 1861. Was Chief Justice of Bexar County During War; served in Texas House, senate afterwards. He married Mary Ann Adams of Tuscaloosa, Ala. They became parents of 9 children. His famous practice of letting his cattle run about unbranded gave English language the word "Maverick", meaning an independent person, as well as unbranded animal. Texas' Maverick County and town were named in his honor.

13-Menger Hotel

Marker Title: Menger Hotel
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1965
Marker Location: Menger Hotel, 204 Alamo Plaza, San Antonio.
Marker Text: Early San Antonio boarding house keeper, Wm. Menger in 1859 opened fine stone hotel, the "new" Menger, beside Alamo Plaza. To host Indians, presidents, poets, actors, generals, singers, public of the world. Served venison, quail, mutton, beef, soup made of San Antonio River turtles. Bar's vintages had ice imported by Gulf steamers and expressed to San Antonio in special wagons. Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders were recruited here.

13-Benjamin Rush Milam

Marker Title: Benjamin Rush Milam
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: Park located at W. Commerce & San Saba & W. Houston & San Roza, San Antonio.
Marker Text: (Front) Benjamin Rush Milam (Right) Preeminent Hero of Texas a man of rare initiative and courage. Of a modest and willing personality a devoted friend. Born in Frankford Kentucky in 1788 a soldier in the War of 1812. (back) Trader with the Texas Comanche Indians in 1818, was a Colonel in the long Tresplacious expedition in 1820. Texas Colonizer 1826 to 1835. First navigator of the upper Red River in 1831. (Left) Assisted in the capture of Goliad October ninth 1835. Planned the attack on San Antonio and was killed on December seventh 1835 while commanding the Texas Forces which later captured the town . (back) Elected by the State of Texas 1936 with funds appropriated by the Federal Government to commemorate nine hundred years of Texas Independence.

13-Colonel Edward Miles

Marker Title: Colonel Edward Miles
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1964
Marker Location: St. Mary's St., Palmetto St., San Antonio (near center point of graveyard).
Marker Text: Colonel Edward Miles, noted Texas soldier Col. Edward Miles (Feb. 8, 1816-April 1, 1889) came to Texas 1829. Served in battles of Anahuac and San Jacinto in Texas War for Independence and the Indian, Mexican and Civil Wars. Born Natchez, Miss., married Mary Ann Sawyer,

13-Mission San Francisco Xavier de Najera

Marker Title: Mission San Franscico Xavier de Najera
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: By golf course Mission Rd., just beyond mission, San Antonio.
Marker Text: Established in 1722. Its Indian Neophytes, few in number, passed into the care of the missionaries at San Antonio e Valero in 1726. The land was later granted to the mission Nuestra Senora De la Purisima Conception De Acunia. Reestablished in this vicinity in 1731.

13-Pajalache Acequia

Marker Title: Pajalache Acequia (Ditch)
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: On Presa & Riverwalk (north side), San Antonio
Marker Text: Pajalache Acequia (Ditch) constructed early in the 18th century by the Pajalache Indians as a part of their irrigation system, began here in La Villita and ended at Mission Concepcion. The Padres and the Indians traveled in Canoes between these places, as the Acequia was wide and deep.

13-Plaza De Armas

Marker Title: Plaza De Armas (Military Plaza)
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1971
Marker Location: E. side of Military Plaza, San Antonio
Marker Text: One of oldest permanently settled locals in Texas, this area was first explored by Spaniards in 1691. The Presidio (Fort) of Bexar was relocated here in 172 and for many years, Plaza was enclosed on three sides by adobe fortifications. During Mexican rebellion of 1813, captured rebels were placed in Comandancie (now old Governer's Palace) and alter executed on Plaza. Many lynchings also occurred at a great oak here. Military importance of Plaza declined in Republic of Texas Era (1836-45) but place came to be one of the liveliest spots in Texas. A busy market, it teemed with noisy vendors of vegetables, fresh eggs, chili peppers, and live chickens. Oxcarts and wagons stood bulging with hay, hides, and wood. Strolling guitarist, tourist, and girls selling songbirds mingled with pickpockets and other characters. Frequently cock fights were held. After the 1850s, the Plaza was dominated by a stone courthouse (nicknamed the "Bat Cave"). In the 1880s and later, leading merchants here were the "Chili Queens", who dispensed pungent Mexican food at open Air stands. The present City Hall was completed in 1892, and the old market was moved several blocks west. Although no longer a military or commercial center, ancient plaza remains the municipal heart of San Antonio.

13-San Antonio Missions National Historical Park

Museum Name: San Antonio Missions National Historical Park
Mailing Address: 2202 Roosevelt Ave.
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78210
Area Code: 210
Phone: 534-8833
County: Bexar

13-Erasmo Seguin

Marker Title: Erasmo Seguin
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: Corner of Dwyers & East Nueva-south side of courthouse square, San Antonio.
Marker Text: Born in San Antonio; descendant of Frenchman who settled in Mexico before 1714. Always a civic leader, helped found first public school in San Antonio, 1812. Went (1821) with Juan M. Veramendi to escort Austin Colony leaders to Bexar, and ever after befriended Stephen F. Austin and Anglo-American settlers. Seguin was postmaster of San Antonio, 1823-35, and deputy for Texas in National Congrss of Mexico, 1823-24. After Santa Anna came to power as liberal (1831), then made himself dictator, Seguin joined neighbors in sending him "San Antonio Remonstrances" (protests) in 1832, and called an opposition convention in 1834. Expelled from the postmastership by Santa Anna's brother-in-law, Gen. Cos, and made to flee from San Antonio on foot, he walked 33 miles to his ranch, Casa Blanca, where he recruited men to help patriots win siege of Bexar (Dec. 1835) and expel Gen. Cos. Early in 1836 he sent spies to the Nueces to watch for Santa Anna. He lodged David Crockett in his home, and provisioned the Alamo before the final siege. Persecuted by newcomers to Texas, he refused to go to Mexico with his son Juan, but with his wife Josefa Becerra retired to Casa Blanca (located in present Wilson County), where he died and was buried in 1857.

13-Jefferson Davis Smith

Marker Title: Jefferson Davis Smith
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1993
Marker Location: Coker Cemetery, 231 E. W. Loop Rd, east of Hwy. 281, San Antonio (adjacent to Coker U.M. Church).
Marker Text: Jefferson (Jeff) Davis Smith, son of Henry M. and Fanny (short) Smith, was born in Kendall County, Texas. Jeff, age 9, and his brother Clint, age 11, were kidnapped by Lipan and Comanche Indians while herding sheep near their home in 1871. Jeff was reportedly bought by Apache Chief Geronimo and made to join his tribe. Mexican bandits captured him to return him to his family for a $1000 reward about 1878. He married Julia Harriet Reed in 1894 and moved to San Antonio.

A visitor to our site states that the address for this is incorrect. It should be 231 W. North Loop Rd. Thanks, Grady, for the correction.

13-John W. Smith

Marker Title: John W. Smith
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: (S. Side of Plaza) Villa St. San Antonio
Marker Text: Great early San Antonio leader, a native of North Carolina. Moved to Illinois, then to Missouri, where he was sheriff of Rawls County in 1824. Came to Texas with Green DeWitt in 1826 and settled at Gonzales. Smith moved to San Antonio in 1828 and was soon in banking-mercantile, brokerage-contracting business. Loyal to Democracy and opposed to dictatorship, he was active in defending Texas against Mexico, 1835-42. He participated in "affair at Gonzales" (Oct. 2, 1835), "storming of Bexar" (Dec. 1835), siege of the Alamo (March 1836), and the battle of the Salado (Oct. 1842). Divorced on Jan. 15, 1831, in Missouri from Harriet Stone, he married Maria Curbelo, a descendant of the Canary Islanders who came to San Antonio in 1731. Attorney for many pioneer Texans, he was dominant political figure in Bexar County during 1836-45 era. Elected first county clerk on May 1, 1837 and first Mayor of San Antonio Sept. 18, 1837, by Jan. 1838 he had been appointed postmaster as well. From 1842 to 1845 he served he republic as senator from Bexar. During regular session of the 9th Congress, he died at Washington-on-the-Brazos. His grave is located in a State Park there. This marker stands at the site of his early home in La Villita De San Fernando.

13-Spanish Governor's Palace

Museum Name: Spanish Governor's Palace
Mailing Address: 105 Plaza de Armas
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78205
Area Code: 210
Phone: 224-0601
County: Bexar

13-Storming of Bexar

Marker Title: Vicinity of the Storming of Bexar
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1971
Marker Location: On NE corner of Main Plaza, Main Ave. San Antonio
Marker Text: (December 5-9, 1835) First of four major engagements of the War for Texas Independence, this sanguinary battle ended a siege of six weeks. The assault began at dawn, Dec. 5. 300 volunteers (Texans, Mexicans, and Americans) under Cols. Frank W. Johnson and Benjamin R. Milam attacked 1,200 Mexican troops commanded by Gen. Martin P. de Cos defending San Antonio, then known as Bexar. Two columns advanced into the strongly fortified town along Acequia (now Main) and Soledad streets guided by townsmen John W. Smith (first mayor of San Antonio), Hendrick Arnold (famous scout and free Negro), "Deaf" Smith (who helped destroy Vince's Bridge at Battle of San Jacinto), and Samuel A. Maverick (a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence). The Texans gained the "priest's house" Dec. 8 after bitter house-to-house fighting. This Mexican strong point dominated Main Plaza. Covered by a fusillade of musketry, the Mexicans retired to the Alamo and sent a white flag to the Plaza the following day. An honorable truce with a brave enemy was signed on Dec. 10 in the "Cos House" in historic La Villita. Later engagements--fall of the Alamo and massacre at Goliad--were followed by final victory and Texas Independence at San Jacinto, April 21, 1836. (1971)

13-Texas Pioneer, Trail Driver and Texas Ranger Museum

Museum Name: Texas Pioneer, Trail Driver, and Texas Ranger Museum
Mailing Address: 3805 Broadway
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78209
Area Code: 210
Phone: 822-9011
County: Bexar

13-General David E. Twiggs

Marker Title: Surrender of Federal Forces by General David E. Twiggs
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1965
Marker Location: On Municipal Plaza Bldg., corner of Main & Commerce, San Antonio.
Marker Text: Brought about as Texas moved to expel 2600 federal troops- a step necessary after secession. Frontier fighter Ben McCulloch with 400 volunteers forced surrender negotiated at headquarters of Gen. Twiggs a block and a half from here, by 4 representatives of the Texas Committee on public safety. Talks began Feb. 8, 1861; were stalled by Feb. 15. That night 90 of McCulloch's men stole in, fixed guns on Federal Sentries and Garrison in Alamo Plaza. 300 more Texas troops entered the city. The 160 men of Twiggs' force were disarmed and held in Quarters. On Feb. 16, Gen. Twiggs agreed to evacuate his troops with arms and personal gear. Further pressure was used and one Feb. 18 he surrendered over $3,000,000 worth of Federal Property: Ordnance, wagons, mules horses, supplies, money and a chain of forts. Gen. Twigs, native of Georgia, career soldier, veteran of war of 1812 and Mexican war, was 70 and in poor health. He held sacred his oath as an officer. Since Dec. 27, 1860, he had written 4 times to his superior in Washington, general of the army Winfield Scott, for orders to use in event Texas seceded. He had no reply. Nevertheless, surrender brought him dismissal for treachery and personal heartbreak.

13-Woll Invasion

Marker Title: Woll Invasion
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1972
Marker Location: On municipal Plaza Bldg, corner of Main & Commerce, San Antonio.
Marker Text: Mexico's last invasion of the Republic of Texas alarmed San Antonio on Sept. 11, 1842, when Gen. Adrian Woll and 1300 troops struck the city from the west. Awakened by booming cannon, 56 Texians (including Judge, Jurors, and citizens in town to attend court) bravely attempted to defend the city. They fortified the stone home of Samuel A. Maverick at northeast corner of Main Plaza, and poured out gunfire as Woll entered with flags flying and band playing. Forced to surrender to overwhelming numbers, 52 Texians--including Maverick, Judge Anderson Hutchinson, and Clerk James L.Trueheart--were marched 1100 mile to Perote Prison in Mexico. Although Mayor John W. Smith and county clerk Thomas Addicks escaped, San Antonio had no city or county government and very little economic activity in the ensuing 23 months. On his way to capture the capitol of the republic in Austin, Woll was defeated at the Salado by Mathew Caldwell's volunteers on Sept. 17, 1842. On March 24, 1844, the last surviving prisoners of Woll's invasion were freed from Perote Castle. They made their way on foot to Vera Cruz, and were taken by a United States man-of-war to New Orleans. From there they finally traveled safely home.

13-Don Juan Ximenes

Marker Title: Don Juan Ximenes
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1962
Marker Location: San Fernando Cem. No. 1, block 12-P-25, Vera Cruz St., San Antonio.
Marker Text: Don Juan Ximenes, born in San Antonio de Bexar, 1810; veteran in the Texas War for Independence, 1835-1836. One of the storming party at Bexar, December 5, 1835; an honored citizen, soldier and Ranger of Texas; died July 22, 1877.

14-Gallagher Ranch

Marker Title: Gallagher Ranch
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: From San Antonio, take SH 16 about 23 mi. NW to Bexar, Medina Co. line-house on private property.
Marker Text: Fort and ranch house built by Peter Gallagher (1812-1878), Irish-Texan engineer, merchant, ranger, and diarist of the Texan-Santa Fe Expedition. The hacienda of native stone, with rifle slits to protect form Indian attack, was bought 1927 by H.V. McNutt as headquarters of early Texas guest ranch. The rambling Mexican-style home has known distinguished guests and the routine of a working ranch. Presented by American History Club, Austin.

Missions
Mission San Francisco de la Espada (Not Shown on Map)

Marker Title: Mission San Francisco de la Espada (Mission St. Francis of the Sword)
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: Mission Drive, San Antonio
Marker Text: Established in San Antonio in 1731. May have been named for statue of St. Francis in the chapel which, according to tradition, once grasped a sword. One of the few missions near which descendants of the Indian converts and Spaniards still live, Espada is considered by some to date back to Mission San Francisco De Los Tejas, founded in East Texas in 1690. A succession moves eventually brought it here. The original buildings at Espada, the farthest south of the five missions near San Antonio, were undoubtedly of adobe. A wall surrounded the church (usually called a chapel), friary, granary,and work shops. Extensive farms and pastures lay nearby. By 1745 the Indians produced grain and beans, and the missioned owned 1,150 head of cattle and 750 sheep. One of the few remaining early structures is the southeast Bastion (fortified round tower), which is the only mission fort left intact in San Antonio. Its three-foot rock walls, which contain holes for cannons and muskets, support a vaulted roof. Composing Espada's once-vital waterworks are a dam (one mile north), an irrigation ditch, and a fine aqueduct (near this site)--the only extant Spanish aqueduct in the United States.

Mission San Juan Capistrano (Not Shown on Map)

Marker Title: Mission San Juan Capistrano
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: (San Juan Mission Parking lot) On Mission Rd./Espada Rd., just S. of loop 13, San Antonio
Marker Text: Founded in March, 1731, by Franciscan Missionaries on the banks of the San Antonio River; Named for St. John of Capistrano, who in 1456 lead a European religious crusade that saved the city of Belgrade from infidels. Mission San Juan was a successor to Mission San Jose De Los Nazonis, established in 1716 in east Texas. It moved here due to the difficulty of defense. One of a complex of missions, San Juan was devoted to the cultural and religious conversion of the Coahuiltecan-speaking Indians of south Texas. During the uncertain early years, buildings were constructed, crops planted, and the Indians had to be continually persuaded to stay long enough to reap the benefits of civilization Apache raids, cholera and smallpox epidemics, and harassment by the Civil authorities also plagued the missions constantly. By 1762, however, San Juan had surplus harvests of corn, cotton, beans, chili peppers, watermelons,and cantaloupes. It also owned numerous cattle, sheep, goats, and horses. The 203 resident Indians lived in thatched huts; the chapel and convent were of stone. The mission was secularized in 1794. In 1967, when the buildings were restored, many artifacts relating to the three centuries of occupancy were unearthed.

Mission San Jose (Not Shown on Map)

Marker Title: Mission San Jose
City: San Antonio
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1962
Marker Location: Mission San Jose, Mission Dr. San Antonio
Marker Text: N/A

The Alamo (Not Shown on Map)

Museum Name: The Alamo
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2599
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78299
Street Address: 300 Alamo Plaza
Area Code: 210
Phone: 225-1391
County: Bexar

San Fernando Cathedral (Not Shown on Map)

Marker Title: San Fernando Cathedral
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 1962
Marker Location: Main Ave. at Main Plaza, San Antonio
Marker Text: N/A

Fort Sam Houston Museum (Not Shown on Map)

Museum Name: Fort Sam Houston Museum and National Historic Landmark
Street Address: 1207 Stanley Road
City: San Antonio
Zip Code: 78234 5002
Area Code: 210
Phone: 221-1886
County: Bexar

Fort Sam Houston, 4th U.S. Army Headquarters Quadraline (Not Shown on Map)

Marker Title: Fort Sam Houston, 4th U.S. Army Headquarters Quadraline
County: Bexar
Marker Location: New Braunfels Rd., San Antonio
Marker Text:--

Picture of Geier and Schmid Farm Historical Marker
Picture provided courtesy of Jean M. Heide
Site of Geier and Schmid Farm

Marker Title: Site of Geier and Schmid Farm
Address: 12900 Mount Olympus
Marker Location: Located on the 12th fairway of the Olympia Hills Golf Course
City: Universal City
County: Bexar
Year Marker Erected: 2001
Marker Text: Site of Geier and Schmid Farm This site was once the farm of German immigrants Martin Schmid and Wilhelm Geier. Wilhelm, his wife, Theodora, and their daughter, Johanna, immigrated to Texas from Wolfenbuettel, arriving at the Port of Galveston in 1849. They moved inland and settled first in New Braunfels, where Johanna Geier married Martin Schmid, from the state of Wuerttemberg, in 1854. Martin, Johanna and her parents moved to the new community of Selma, then known as Cibolo, in 1855. They bought 127 acres of land and established a farm for each family. In 1869, Geier and Schmid agreed to split the land, each receiving a portion. Martin and Johanna Schmid reared four children in Selma: William, Sam, Sedonia Haile and Mary Elizabeth Wuest. Martin, a Civil War veteran who served under Capt. Theodore Podewils' 32nd Regiment of the Texas Cavalry, died in 1880 and was buried in this immediate area, thus establishing the Schmid family cemetery. Johanna remained on the farm until 1894, when she sold it and moved to San Antonio. She, along with her parents, two of her infant children, son William and daughter Sedonia, were buried in the family cemetery. All original fencing and tombstones have disappeared from the Schmid family cemetery, as they have from the Kincaid family cemetery, which lies 100 yards northwest. Kentucky native David Kincaid moved his family to this area and was the town blacksmith. His wife, Talitha; their daughters Esther Ada Kincaid Wallace and Josephine P. Kincaid; and Talitha's father, John Davis, are buried in the Kincaid cemetery. Their stories reflect the patterns of settlement and rural life in this part of Texas in the 19th century. (2001)


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