Search

Michael has a BA in History & American Studies and an MSc in American History from the University of Edinburgh. He comes from a proud military family and has spent most of his career as an educator in the Middle East and Asia. Please consider reading our editorial policy to understand how and why we publish the resources we do.

Don't forget to like and follow our brand new Facebook page for access to updates and news before anyone else.

Part of our in-depth series exploring Southern Early American Forts

Camp Dix, a Confederate outpost established by James M. Norris on April 4, 1862, was at the crossing of the San Antonio-Eagle Pass road and the Frio River, a spot on the river known as Black Waterhole, seven miles east of Uvalde. The camp was a Frontier Regiment post under the command of Capt. John J. Dix, Jr. The road had become a vital commercial route to Mexico for the Confederate cause when the Union forces gained control of the entry points to Mexico along the lower Rio Grande. Camp Dix was one of several encampments established to protect Confederate export wagon trains on their way to Mexico. It was abandoned after the consolidation of the Frontier Regiment in March 1864.

Join the discussion

Recent Comments