Terrell County
Historical Markers

Texas Brazos Trail Region

Map of Terrell County

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Terrell County Memorial Museum | Terrell County | Terrell, General Alexander W.

Terrell County Memorial Museum

Museum Name: Terrell County Memorial Museum
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 7
City: Sanderson
Zip Code: 79848
Street Address: 210 Mansfield St
County: Terrell
Types of Exhibits/Collections: Military, Photos, Historical, Local/Pioneer History, Archives

Terrell County

Marker Title: Terrell County
Address: US 90
City: Sanderson
County: Terrell
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: On US 90, 1 mile W. of Sanderson
Marker Text: Formed from Pecos County. Created April 8,1905, organized September 19, 1905. Named in honor of Alexander Watkins Terrell 1827-1912. A distinguished officer in the confederate army member of the Texas legislature for sixteen years. Sanderson, the County Seat.

General Alexander W. Terrell

Marker Title: General Alexander W. Terrell
Address: Hackberry & Second St.
City: Sanderson
County: Terrell
Year Marker Erected: 1963
Marker Location: Courthouse Lawn, corner of Hackberry and Second Sts., Sanderson
Marker Text: Born Virginia. Came to Texas 1852-Dist. Judge 1857-63. Entered confederate service 1863 as Lt. Col. Commanded Terrell's Texas cavalry. Assigned special duty to try to keep open vital supply sources of cotton-lifeblood of South. Led his unit in Red River campaign 1864 to prevent Union invasion of Texas, being wounded battle Mansfield. Promoted Brigadier General 1865. Went to Mexico rather than surrender at war's end, soon returned to Texas. As state legislator authored present primary election law. Minister to Turkey 1893-97. Outstanding lawyer and public servant. Texas made an all-out effort for the confederacy after a 3 to 1 popular vote for secession. 90,000 troops, famed for mobility and daring, fought on every battlefront. A 2,000-mile frontier and coastline was successfully defended from union troops and savage Indians. Wagon trains, laden with cotton-life blood of the south-crossed the state to Mexico to trade for medical supplies, clothing, military goods, state and private industry produced wagons, pots, kettles, leather goods, ammunition, guns, salt, hospital supplies. At home old men, women, children, slaves provided grain, meats, cotton, cloth to the army, giving much, keeping little. A memorial to Texans who served the confederacy erected by the state of Texas 1963.


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