Lubbock County Historical Markers

Texas Plains Trail Region

Map of Lubbock County Historic Sites

Topics (click on a topic to jump to that section).
Bledsoe Santa Fe Depot | Coronado High School | Estacado Cemetery | Free Range Era of Ranching, Northwest Texas, 1878-1885 | Lubbock | Lubbock Lake Landmark - Museum of Texas Tech University | Lubbock Lake Landmark State Historical Park | Lubbock Lake Site | Colonel T.S. Lubbock and Texas in the Civil War | Site of Old Lubbock | Mackenzie Scout Trail | General Ranald Slidell Mackenzie | Ranching Heritage Center | Ransom Canyon | Slaton Museum | Texas Air Museum, Caprock Chapter

Bledsoe Santa Fe Depot

Marker Title: Bledsoe Santa Fe Depot
Address: 6105 19th Street
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: 6105 Nineteenth Street, Lubbock
Marker Text: A relic from one of America's last frontiers. Built in 1925 on range land of newly organized Cochran County, at Bledsoe, this structure not only served its purpose as a railroad station, but was a meeting hall for churches and social groups. Sheepherders and cowboys would bed down on its floor when detained at the station in shipping season. Phased out of service by 1966, structure was moved 70 miles to be preserved by Gene Hemmle. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1973.

Coronado High School

Marker Title: Coronado High School
Address: 3331 Vicksburg
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: 3331 Vicksburg, Lubbock
Marker Text: Opened in 1965. Named for Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, the Spanish explorer who, guided by an Indian known as "The Turk", traversed the Llano Estacado in search of the fabled "city" of Gran Quivira in 1541. The expedition wandered for many days through western Texas, possibly passing the vicinity of Lubbock. 1969

Estacado Cemetery

Marker Title: Estacado Cemetery
Address: 8 mi. N on FM 1527 from FM 378, 2.5 mi. W on FM 1527, S on county road.
City: Lorenzo
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1982
Marker Location: From Lorenzo, take FM 378 bout 8 miles north to FM 1527. Follow FM 1527 west about 2.5 miles and go south on county road.
Marker Text: In 1878 Paris Cox (1846-1888), an Indiana Quaker, visited this area with a group of buffalo hunters. Attracted by the abundance of cheap farm land, he returned to Indiana and began advertising his plans for a Quaker colony here. Although the first colonists who arrived in 1879 were discouraged by a severe winter, other settlers, including those of various religious beliefs, soon moved to the area. The settlement was first called Maryetta in honor of Cox's wife, but in 1886 it was renamed Estacado, part of the Spanish term for the Staked Plains, Llano Estacado. When Crosby County was formally organized in 1886, Estacado was chosen as the first county seat. A courthouse was built two years later. The center of a vast agricultural area, Estacado continued to prosper until the 1890s when the county seat was moved to Emma and many of the early colonists began migrating to other areas. An important reminder of Estacado's pioneers is this community cemetery, the burial site of many early settlers and area leaders, including Paris Cox. Now part of Lubbock County, it serves as a historic record of the individuals who opened the Texas Plains and led in the region's agricultural development. 1982

Free Range Era of Ranching, Northwest Texas, 1878-1885

Marker Title: Free Range Era of Ranching, Northwest Texas, 1878-1885
Address: FM 114 & University Drive
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1970
Marker Location: Restoration Complex, Texas Tech, FM 114 and University Drive, Lubbock.
Marker Text: After Indians and buffalo were removed in 1870s, several hundred cattlemen with small herds came to rolling plains near site of later Lubbock, to graze free range. Vital natural water sources were found east of the Caprock, where springs and streams were fed from the Ogallala Formation of the High Plains. Here, with good years and rising prices, the free rangers prospered until 1884, when syndicates began purchasing land and enclosing large blocks with barbed wire. Free range men had to sell their herds to the syndicates or move farther west. The Spur Ranch alone acquired over 500,000 acres of land and bought cattle and brands from 37 of the free rangers. Similar ranches were developed by the Curry Comb, IOA, Jumbo, Long S, Magnolia, Matador, Pitchfork, Square and Compass, T Bar and Two Buckle interests. By 1885 all free range operations were transformed into large, enclosed ranches. Some free rangers exchanged cattle for stock in syndicates, others were employed by syndicates, and a few moved to Arizona, New Mexico or Wyoming. A few-- including the Edwards, Long and Slaughter Families-- acquired land and became sizable operators. 1970

Lubbock

Marker Title: Lubbock
Address: US Hwy 84
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1964
Marker Location: US Hwy 84, NW side of town city limits S. side of hwy.
Marker Text: Founded 1891. Named for Col. Thomas S. Lubbock, Texas Republic soldier and Civil War hero. Incorporated 1909. Commercial-marketing-processing heart of a mechanized-irrigated cotton, grain and cattle area. Home of Texas Tech, Lubbock Christian College, West Texas Museum, Mackenzie State Park.

Lubbock Lake Landmark - Museum of Texas Tech University

Museum Name: Lubbock Lake Landmark - Museum of Texas Tech University
Mailing Address: Box 43191
City: Lubbock
Zip Code: 79409
Street Address: 2400 Landmark Drive
Area Code: 806
Phone: 742-1116
County: Lubbock
Types of Exhibits/Collections: Science, Natural History, Archeology, Interactive

Lubbock Lake Landmark State Historical Park

Museum Name: Lubbock Lake Landmark State Historical Park
Mailing Address
: 2202 Landmark Lane
City: Lubbock
Zip Code: 79415
Street Address: 2401 Landmark Drive
Area Code: 806
Phone: 765-0737
County: Lubbock

Lubbock Lake Site

Marker Title: Lubbock Lake Site
Address: Hwy 84, approx. 1/2 mi NW of Loop 289 overpass
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1970
Marker Location: Hwy 84, approx. 1/2 mi NW of Loop 289 overpass.
Marker Text: This bend in the Yellowhouse Canyon has seen the passing of man from the time of the prehistoric mammouth-hunting Llano culture of 12,000 years ago. An archeological site of great importance lies in the bottom of this valley; here is recorded the evidence of periodic visits by nomadic hunting groups and plains Indians. Springs and water holes made this spot a favored hunting and camping site in prehistoric and early historic times, but it is noted mainly for providing the first radio-carbon date on the Folsom culture of 10,000 years ago and the association of man-made artifacts with bones of extinct mammoths, horses, bison, and camels. Some historians think Coronado passed here in 1541 and Spanish expeditions coming from Santa Fe to the Concho River looking for fresh-water pearls passed this way in the middle 1600s. Later visitors were buffalo hunters and Indian fighters in the 1870s. A general store--first commercial building in the area--was built here about 1880 by George W. Singer. Patronized by ranchers, cowboys, and dwindling numbers of buffalo hunters and friendly Indians, Singer's became a post office in 1884 and a widely known landmark by 1885. The building burned, 1886. More

Colonel T.S. Lubbock and Texas in the Civil War

Marker Title: Colonel T.S. Lubbock and Texas in the Civil War
Address: courthouse lawn
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1964
Marker Location: Courthouse Lawn.
Marker Text: (1817-1862) South Carolinian. Came to Texas 1835. Indian fighter, soldier, businessman. Member Secession Convention. Went to Virginia hoping to fight for South in first battle of war. Commended for valuable volunteer service as scout and reporting enemy troop positions in First Battle of Manassas. Sent to Texas to raise regiment for Army of Virginia. Upon organization, the 8th Texas Cavalry- famed Terry's Rangers- elected him Lieutenant Colonel. Went to Kentucky. When Terry was killed, Rangers unanimously elected him Colonel. Ill with typhoid fever, he died soon after. Buried Glenwood Cemetery, Houston. Texas in the Civil War 1861-1865 -- Texas made an all-out effort for the Confederacy after a 3 to 1 popular vote for secession. 90,000 troops, famed for mobility and daring, fought on every battlefront. A 2,000 mile frontier and coast were successfully defended from Union troop invasion and savage Indians. Texas was the storehouse of Western Confederacy. Wagon trains laden with cotton- life blood of the South- crossed the state to Mexico to trade for medical supplies, clothing, military supplies. State and private industry produced guns, ammunition, wagons, pots, kettles, leather goods, salt, hospital supplies. Wives, sons, daughters, slaves provided corn, cotton, cloth, cattle, hogs, cured meats to the Army, giving much, keeping little for themselves. Erected by the State of Texas 1964.

Site of Old Lubbock

Marker Title: Site of Old Lubbock
Address: Hwy 87
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: Hwy 87 directly across from entrance to Lubbock Country Club.
Marker Text: A predecessor of present Lubbock, this area was, in 1890, a subject of heated dispute by three factions (led by W.D. Crump, W.E. Rayner, and Frank Wheelock) that vied in the founding of the county seat. Unlike most county seat debaters in Texas, though, these men had no long-established towns to support. Their main interest was in organizing the county. In the course of the rivalry, the groups founded two settlements. the Crump faction, later joined by the Wheelock group and several financial backers, started "Old Lubbock" at this site. Called "North Town" because it was located north of Yellow House Canyon, the site took in section 7, block A, bounded by the present streets of Quirt, Ash, Erskine, and Kent. The site soon attained a population of about 50 and boasted a reported 37 buildings, including the most historic one in the county: the Nicolett Hotel. Rayner's rival settlement south of the canyon was named "Monterey" and was popularly called "South Town". Suprisingly, though, the factions did not reach the permanent hostility common to such disputes. On December 19, 1890, they united in a compromise unique in West Texas history; and as a result, the city of Lubbock was founded on the site where it now stands.

Mackenzie Scout Trail

Marker Title: Mackenzie Scout Trail
Address: Broadway & Ave. H
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: (Courthouse Grounds adjacent), intersection of H and Broadway, Lubbock. Private Marker.
Marker Text: This marks one route of the Mackenzie Scout Trail extending from Camp Supply, Crosby County to Fort Sumner, New Mexico and used by the Army, 1872-1875, by buffalo hunters, 1876-1878, and by cattlemen 1878 until the fencing of the range. Erected by Nancy Anderson Chapter, N.S.D.A.R. 1936. This block of granite is from the wall that encloses the grave of Nancy Anderson, 1750-1827, near Chester, S.C.

General Ranald Slidell Mackenzie

Marker Title: General Ranald Slidell Mackenzie
Address: Mackenzie Park
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: Mackenzie Park
Marker Text: Born in New York City on July 24, 1840, Mackenzie attained the rank of Major General during the Civil War. On February 25, 1871, at Fort Concho, Texas, he assumed command as Colonel of the 4th Cavalry, which soon became the finest regiment in the army. He commanded three expeditions into this region against the Indians. The first, in 1871 against the Comanches, was unsuccessful; but in 1872 he found two feasible routes across the vast, hitherto unexplored, Llano Estacado; and on September 29, he defeated the Comanches on the north fork of the Red River. After a successful raid into Mexico in 1873, he commanded three of five columns of army troops in a final campaign against the Comanches, Kiowas, and Southern Cheyennes; and on September 28, 1874, he surprised and destroyed three of their villages in the depths of Palo Duro Canyon, also capturing 1,424 horses and mules in the engagement. Left without food, shelter, supplies, and horses, the southern plains tribes then submitted to life on the reservation, thereby opening western Texas to white settlement. Later promoted to Brigadier General, Mackenzie died in New York, January 19, 1889, and was buried in West Point Cemetery. This park is named in his honor.

Ranching Heritage Center

Museum Name: Ranching Heritage Center
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 43200
City: Lubbock
Zip Code: 79409
Street Address: 3121 4th and Indiana Ave.
Area Code: 806
Phone: 742-0498
County: Lubbock

Ransom Canyon

Marker Title: Ransom Canyon
Address: 3.5 mi. E on FM 835; 2.5 mi. E on FM 3523 to Ransom Canyon
City: Lubbock
County: Lubbock
Year Marker Erected: 1994
Marker Location: Located at community center on lake in Ransom Canyon. From Lubbock, take FM 835 E 3.5 miles, take FM 3523 2.5 miles E and enter canyon. Follow main road about .5 miles to Waterfront Community Center.
Marker Text: Spanish explorers crossed this canyon, part of the larger Yellow House Canyon, perhaps as early as the 1540s. Jumano, Apache, and Comanche Indians camped here to take advantage of the canyon's protective walls, fresh water springs, trees, and abundant game. In the late 1700s New Mexican traders known as Comancheros began to exchange agricultural and craft products of their villages for buffalo hides, horses, and other items of the Plains Indians along a trade route which passed through this canyon. In the 1800s a number of captives were brought here by Comanche Indians and sold to Comancheros. The Comanchero practice of demanding ransom for their release gave rise to the canyon's name. By the 1870s mostly buffalo hunters and ranchers occupied the area. In 1884 the Western Land and Livestock Company bought most of the land in the canyon area and operated the famous IOA Ranch. The IOA Ranch venture failed and in 1901 the canyon became the site of the O6 Ranch. From 1915 until 1961 Ransom Canyon was part of a large ranch owned by the Johnston Family. In 1961 investors purchased the canyon area and in 1965 platted Lake Ransom Canyon Village. The village was incorporated in 1978. 1994

Slaton Museum

Museum Name: Slaton Museum
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 555
City: Slaton
Zip Code: 79364
Street Address: 155 N 8th Street
Area Code: 806
Phone: 828-6101
County: Lubbock

Texas Air Museum, Caprock Chapter

Museum Name: Texas Air Museum, Caprock Chapter
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 667
City: Slaton
Zip Code: 79364
Street Address: Slation Municipal Airport
Area Code: 806
Phone: 828-4664
County: Lubbock
Types of Exhibits/Collections: Historical


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