Newt Price

    Newt Price, who lived in Hunt County, and staying with Henry Clark, at the latter's home, about six miles southeast of Stephenville, had been out to hunt a horse, and was about one-half mile from home, when the Indians surrounded him. Newt Price then attempted to run through the lines, and when he did, received an arrow in his back. He made a run for the home of H. Kye Danley, and when he had gone about one mile, his horse ran under a limb and he fell to the ground. The Indians then ran up and stabbed Newt Price, and were attempting to scalp him when he threw up a badly crippled hand that had been burned when a baby. The savages had already pulled off his shoes, but when they discovered that this white boy was crippled, he was not scalped nor otherwise further molested. The Indians then rode away, and didn't even take his shoes.

    Newt Price's horse ran on down to the home of H. Kye Danley, who mounted the steed and was back to its rider within five minutes after he had been speared. He was then removed to the house, and Doctor W. W. McNeil, of Stephenville, summoned to his aid. Newt Price lived seven days before he died.

    Note: Author personally interviewed: H. Kye Danley, mentioned above; C. E. Ferguson; Ike Roberts; and others who then lived in that section.

The above story is from the book, The West Texas Frontier, by Joseph Carroll McConnell.

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