Uvalde County
Historical Markers

Texas Hill Country Trail Region
Numbers 2-6
Topics (click on a topic to jump to that section).
2-Baylor, General John R. | 5-Chalk Bluff Indian Massacre | 5-Davenport Home, Old | 5-Fisher, King | 5-Garner Museum, John Nance | 5-Garrett, Pat | 5-Hays, Captain John Coffee | 4-Highsmith, Benjamin F. | 5-Inge, Site of Fort | 5-Inge, Site of Fort | 5-Inge, Fort; Camp Dix, C. S. A. | 2-Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria, Site of the Mission | 2-Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria Mission, Near Site of | 6-Sabinal | 6-Sabinal, Site of Camp | 4-Sabinal Canyon Museum | 3-Silver Mine Pass | 4-Utopia | 5-Wagon Yards, Early Texas
Uncommemorated and Unmapped Sites.
Bowles and Davenport | Henry Robinson and Henry Adams | Julius Sanders | Dr. John Richardson | Killing of Henry Robinson | Berry C. Buckalew | R.M. Ware | Mrs. R.H. Kincheloe | Paint Davis | Theodore Kindla | Ben Pulliam | Leaky, John | White, Mr. | Lieutenant Knox

Southern Texas Map

2-General John R. Baylor

Marker Title: General John R. Baylor
Address: US 55
City: Montell
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1963
Marker Location: US 55 just inside Montell limits (past churches), Montell.
Marker Text: Born in Kentucky. Came to Texas Republic 1839. Colorful Indian fighter. In war against Cherokees 1840. Member Texas Legislature 1853. Comanche agent 1855-57. Delegate from Weatherford, Secession Convention. Commanding detachment of Second Regiment Texas Mounted Rifles occupied, took over supplies, Ft. Bliss. June 1861-- during campaign to extend Confederacy westward to the Pacific. Repulsed Federals, Mesilla, N. Mex., July 25. With 200 men took 700 Federals, their transports, arms, ammunition, 200 horses, 270 beeves, four cannon at San Augustin Springs, July 27. With Capitol at Mesilla, organized government, proclaimed Confederate control of Arizona, Aug. 1. Baylor became military, civil governor. Sent C.S.A. Treasury $9,500 captured at Ft. Fillmore. Supervised gold, silver mining for C.S.A. Order to kill instead of capture troublesome Apaches incensed authorities against him, had Baylor recalled to Texas, stripped of rank. As private "served guns in hottest of the fight" to recapture Galveston, Jan. 1, 1863. Salvaged U.S. warship parts to make cannon light enough to go into battle on back of mule. 1863-63 in Confederate Congress. Given new command. Made Brigadier-General 1865. Raised, led troops in frontier defense. Fear of his moves pinned down thousands of Federals in California, Arizona. Climaxed war service on Northwest Texas border. Post-war lived in San Antonio. Farmed, ranched Uvalde County. Buried in Montell. Erected by the state of Texas 1963

2-Site of the Mission Muestra Senora de la Candelaria

Marker Title: Site of the Mission Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria (2nd Marker)
Address: US 55
City: Montell
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: On US 55 just inside Montell limits (past churches), Montell.
Marker Text: First established by Franciscan missionaries in 1749 on the San Gabriel River with the hope of civilizing and Christianizing the Coco, Mayene, Karankawa, Orcoquiza and other Indian tribes. Restablished under the same name on the San Marcos River in 1755. Removed to this site on the Nueces River for the conversion of the Lipan Apaches in 1762. Abandoned in 1769.

2-Near Site of Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria Mission

Marker Title: Near Site of Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria Mission
Address: US 55
City: Montell
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: On US 55 just inside Montell City limits (past churches), Montell
Marker Text: Third mission under this name founded in Texas. Established near here on the Nueces River in 1762 by Franciscan missionaries for the conversion of the Indians and protection of Spanish lands. Typical of many Spanish missions in Texas, Candelaria had twice moved closer to centers of civilization since its first founding in 1749 on the San Gabriel River. Beset with friction between friars and soldiers, the first Candelaria was abandoned in 1755 and then moved to the San Marcos River. Soon, however, the friars found that the Indians were more concerned with protection than with Christianity. In 1757 the mission was again discontinued. In 1762 Candelaria was re-established here, and about 100 Lipan-Apaches quickly volunteered to live within its walls. A chapel, large thatched building, a house, and possibly other structures were erected. But once more, difficulties arose-- scarcity of meat, unrest and insincerity among the mission Indians, inadequate defense, devastating raids by Comanches and Apaches. About 1767 the mission was abandoned for the last time. Little remains of it today, for the smooth building stones were taken by Anglo settlers in the 1800s to build their houses.

3-Silver Mine Pass

Marker Title: Silver Mine Pass
Address: FM 83 and 127
City: Concan
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: (On Highway 83 at intersection with Highway 127 South); from Uvalde, take Highway 83 North about 20 miles to intersection with 127 East - marker fronts Highway 83 at intersection.
Marker Text: Named for silver mine opened near pass by Spaniards in 1700s or earlier. Ore was inferior, and mine was abandoned; but 14 shafts (some interconnecting) remain. Near the mine are remnants of a fortification made by 30 men under the leadership of James Bowie, later (1836) a hero of the siege to the Alamo. In 1831, while at work at this mine, Bowie's men repulsed a Comanche attack in a fierce, all-day battle. Hero of the fight was Bowie's slave, "Black Jim Bowie," who risked his life by leaving the fortification to bring water to the besieged. 1968

Picture of Benjamin Franklin Highsmith
Benjamin Franklin Highsmith
Photo from Sowell's Early Settlers and Indian Fighters
4-Benjamin F. Highsmith

Marker Title: Benjamin F. Highsmith
Address: SH 187, Jones Cemetery
City: Utopia
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: Jones Cemetery, Highway 187, Utopia
Marker Text: Served in the Army of Texas, 1835-36 a Ranger under Capt. John C. Hays, a member of the Somervell Expedition, 1842 born in Missouri Sept. 11, 1817. Died Nov. 20, 1905. His wife, Elizabeth Turner Highsmith, born in Missouri March 22, 1836, died Oct. 7, 1900.

4-Sabinal Canyon Museum

Museum Name: Sabinal Canyon Museum
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 13
Street Address: Main Street
City: Utopia
Zip Code: 78884
Area Code: 830
Phone: 966-2100
County: Uvalde

4-Utopia

Marker Title: Utopia
Address: FM 187
City: Utopia
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: In Utopia: On East Main Street (Highway 187) across from general store.
Marker Text: After an 1886 Indian raid on their nearby Little Creek home, R. H. Kincheloe and family moved here, built a home and in 1873 a 2-story rock store. They platted town as "Montana", giving land for churches, school, and community square. Post office moved from Waresville in 1883. Methodists had church here before town was founded. Baptists organized their church in 1888. Church of Christ congregation relocated here, 1902. New name praising climate was chosen by Postmaster George Barker. Stores and shops were built. Town is now a center for ranching, retirement, vacationing. Marker sponsored by citizens of Utopia - 1973

5-Chalk Bluff Indian Massacre

Marker Title: Chalk Bluff Indian Massacre
Address: US 55 and Chalk Bluff Road
City: Uvalde
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1970
Marker Location: From Uvalde, take Highway 55, West about 15 miles at park, Chalk Bluff Road entrance is at 5 miles south of 334 West.
Marker Text: Here on May 29, 1861, two of southwest Texas' most feared Indian fighters were ambushed by a band of 20 hostile Indians. Henry Robinson-- tall and red-bearded-- was so well known to the tribes that they had painted his picture on a rock near the Llano River. He and his companion Henry Adams (also his daughter's fiancee) were in route to Camp Wood when the attack came. The Indians, after they had killed the two men, took both their scalps and Robinson's beard, too; they then attacked Robinson's home, but his family fought them off successfully. 1970

5-Old Davenport Home

Marker Title: Old Davenport Home
Address: FM 1051 NW of Uvalde
City: Uvalde
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1961
Marker Location: From Uvalde, take Hwy. 83 North about 19.5 miles then go NW on FM 1051 about 8 mile to Box 103 (west side of road).
Marker Text: Originally an early settler's 1-room log house on the dry Frio (1 mi. N), built in era of Lipan-Apache raids and infestation of this frontier by outlaws. Enlarged for his family of 12 by L. C. ("Clabe") Davenort, who moved here about 1884. Added were a second log room, a hall, stone rooms on rear. After cattleman Davenport prospered and built a frame home, the old cabin still was used as kitchen, dining room and guest rooms. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1967.

5-Early Texas Wagon Yards

Marker Title: Early Texas Wagon Yards
Address: Main and Getty
City: Uvalde
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1966
Marker Location: Faces intersection of Main (90) and Getty, Uvalde.
Marker Text: Places of shelter for drivers, teams and wagons. Here travelers could cook bacon, eggs, beans, coffee; talk with friends and strangers. For people from the country, a wagon yard was both a hotel and a social center. Unusually it was an open area flanked by a shed, stalls and feed rooms. It might cover a city block, and charges were 25 (cents) to $1.00 a day. Drivers pulled into yards, cared for teams, found cooking and sleeping space. Men or families might stay for weeks, await kin or goods coming by train or stage. Amusements were practical jokes, gossip, games, music by fiddle, guitar, harmonica. Young boys overcame bashfulness, learned to dance, roller skate, whip bullies. The yard was center for trading goods and horses; obtaining advice on travel, work, weather. Some yards were stops for stages and freighters. A block west of this site was wagon yard of F. A. Piper Company (predecessor of Horner's Store). Like many Texas merchants, Piper built and ran the wagon yard to aid customers, who used it free of charge. Modern transportation has made the wagon yard a relic of the past, but it has a secure place in the history of pioneer days in Texas.

5-King Fisher

Marker Title: King Fisher
Address: 400 block of N. Park Street
City: Uvalde
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: Pioneer Cemetery, 400 block of North Park Street in Uvalde
Marker Text: Celebrated outlaw who became a peace officer. Once undisputed ruler of a 5,000-square-mile area of Southwest Texas, centered in Eagle Pass and known as King Fisher's Territory. Son of Jobe and Lucinda Fisher, at age 17 Fisher settled on Pendencia Creek in Dimmit County, hired by ranchmen to guard their herds from bandits who frequently raided from Mexico, across Rio Grande. A complex and forceful individual, he imposed order in lawless border area. His henchmen rustled cattle and terrorized resisting settlers but also protected them from outside intruders. Near his ranch was sign reading: "This is King Fisher's Road. Take the other". Many prominent men, including Porfirio Diaz, President of Mexico, counted him a friend. Tall, charming, and quite handsome, Fisher wore fine clothes and tiger skin chaps. An expert shot-- with either hand-- he was indicted on six murder charges and 15 lesser counts but was never convicted. Devoted to wife and daughters, he reformed after being arrested in 1876 by Ranger Capt. L. H. McNelly. He was acting Uvalde County sheriff, when, on March 11, 1884, he and the notorious Ben Thompson were killed from ambush at a vaudeville theater in San Antonio. 1973

5-Site of Fort Inge

Marker Title: Site of Fort Inge
City: Uvalde
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1966
Marker Location: take FM 140 SE about 1.25 mi. to Fort Inge Historical Park entrance, then follow drive .2 mi.
Marker Text: Established by Captain Sidney Burbank, First U. S. Infantry, March 13, 1849, on east bank of Leona River in Uvalde County. Named for Lieutenant Zebulon M. P. Inge, killed in Battle of Resaca de La Palma, May 9, 1846, in the Mexican War. Protected the southern Overland Mail route from Indian raids. Visited by Robert E. Lee, 1856. At that time fort consisted of a dozen primitive but neatly kept buildings. Occupied by Confederate soldiers in Civil War. Reoccupied 1866 by Federal troops until abandoned March 28, 1869.

5-Site of Fort Inge

Marker Title: Site of Fort Inge
Address: FM 140, just East of Uvalde in Fort Inge Park
City: Uvalde
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: From Uvalde, take Hwy. 140 SE 1.25 mile to Fort Inge Historical Park entrance, then follow drive in about .2 mile.
Marker Text: Established by Captain Sidney Burbank, first U. S. Infantry, on March 13, 1849. Named in honor of Lieutenant Zebulon M. P. Inge, who fell at Resaca de la Palma May 9, 1846. Protected the southern Overland Mail route from Indians raids. Federal troops, withdrawn in 1961, reoccupied the post from 1866 to February 28, 1869. Later a Texas Ranger camp.

5-Fort Inge, Camp Dix, C.S.A.

Marker Title: Fort Inge, Camp Dix, C.S.A.
Address: Main and Getty Streets
City: Uvalde
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1963
Marker Location: Corner of Main Street (US 90) and Getty, town plaza, Uvalde.
Marker Text: A major road west from San Antonio forked in the area of these forts. One road went toward El Paso, the other to the Rio Grande at Eagle Pass. Travelers heading west "put on their guns" in this region, the start of hostile Indian country, troops from these posts guarded against Indian raids, bandits from Mexico, and marauder. Fort Inge, 4.5 mi. southeast, was on Cotton Road to Eagle Pass over which hundreds of wagons, oxcarts took cotton to Mexico in exchange for vital goods. Part defense line from Brownsville to El Paso. Occupied by volunteer cavalry. (Back of Fort Inge, Camp Dix) Camp Dix, located 7 mi. East. Established in 1862. Part of state frontier defense line a day's horseback ride apart from the Red River to the Rio Grande to protect frontier settlements. Occupied by Texas Frontier Regiment. Although Uvalde County voted 76 to 16 against secession, a number of men joined the Confederate Army. Some, being Unionists, moved to Mexico. The war brought hard times and a rash of Indian attacks. In 1863-64 when Federals held the lower Rio Grande, Eagle Pass became the chief export city for the Confederacy and wagon trains increased along the road. Often without food, clothing, horses, ammunition, the Confederate and State troops, backed by citizens' posses brought a measure of protection to this frontier region. A memorial to Texans who served the Confederacy. Erected by the state of Texas 1963.

5-Pat Garrett

Marker Title: Pat Garrett
Address: US 90
City: Uvalde
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1970
Marker Location: In front of Highway Department (not TX DOT), Highway 90 West, Uvalde.
Marker Text: Pioneer law officer Patrick F. Garrett, renowned for killing outlaw Billy the Kid in 1881, lived in a house at this site during his residence in Uvalde. He had come from Alabama to Texas in 1869; here he worked as a farmer, cowboy, and buffalo hunter. He served as sheriff in several cities and also dealt in ranching operations. He owned property here from 1891 to 1900. In 1908 he was killed in New Mexico after an argument over land, but many people assumed that the quarrel was merely a ruse to force Garrett to fight or be murdered from ambush. 1970

5-Captain John Coffee Hays

Marker Title: Captain John Coffee Hays
Address: SH 187, South of Uvalde
City: Uvalde
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: From Utopia, take Highway 187 South about 9 miles to roadside marker.
Marker Text: In this vicinity - June 24, 1841, Captain John Coffee Hays and his Company of 12 Rangers assisted by thirty Mexicans under Captain Flores encountered ten Comanche Indians and killed eight and captured the other two and none of the Rangers were killed and but one wounded. Erected by the State of Texas 1936.

5-John Nance Garner Museum

Museum Name: John Nance Garner Museum
Street Address: 333 N Park
City: Uvalde
Zip Code: 78801
Area Code: 210
Phone: 278-5018
County: Uvalde

6-Site of Camp Sabinal

Marker Title: Site of Camp Sabinal
Address: US 90 on West side of Sabinal River
City: Sabinal
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: From Sabinal, take Highway 90 West about one mile to west side of Sabinal River. Marker is on south side of road.
Marker Text: Established July 12, 1856 by Capt. Albert G. Brackett, Second U. S. Cavalry as a protection to the San Antonio - El Paso Road and frontier settlers. Occupied by Federal troops until November 1856, later served as a Ranger camp.

6-Sabinal

Marker Title: Sabinal
Address: US 90 and FM 187
City: Sabinal
County: Uvalde
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: .4 miles east on US 90 at intersection with FM 187, Sabinal
Marker Text: Named by Spanish for Rio Sabina and Cypress trees along river. Town founded in 1854 by Thomas B. Hammer who operated a stage shop and was first postmaster. Despite Indian depredations, town thrived as settlers built homes, and a railroad reached here in 1881. In 1906, town was incorporated. Telephone service started. City water works and volunteer fire dept. was organized in 1907. Sabinal Christian College was founded. Closed in 1917. Cotton industry was foremost in early 1900s. Today, farming and ranching flourishing in community. 1967

The following pages describe several Indian encounters faced by the pioneers of Uvalde County. These stories are from the book, Indian Depredations in Texas by J.W. Wilbarger.

Uvalde County stories by Wilbarger


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