Fayette County Historical Markers

Texas Independence Trail Region
Map of Fayette County Historic Sites
Markers (click on a topic to jump to that section.)
Creuzbaur's Battery, C.S.A. - "The Big Guns of Fayette" | Dawson Expedition/Historic Oak | Earthman Farm | Fayette County | Fayette County Courthouse | Fayette Heritage Museum and Archives | Fayetteville | Gotcher Trace | Asa Hill of Rutersville | Early Texas Hotels & Inns | Konrad Joh Log Cabin | Lyons, Site of Former Town of | Monument Hill and Kreische Brewery State Historical Parks | Moore House, Colonel John H. | Robinson, Joseph C. | Ross, James J. | Round Top Area History Museum | Schulenburg Historical Museum | Texas Pioneer Arts Foundation | Twin Blockhouse, Site of a | Winedale Historical Center for American History | Winedale Stagecoach Inn | Wood's Fort, Site of
Uncommemorated Sites (click on a topic to jump to that section.)
Amos R. Alexander | Colorado Depredations-Story One | James J. Ross | Moore's Fort

Museums

Creuzbaur's Battery, C.S.A. - "The Big Guns of Fayette"

Marker Title: Creuzbaur's Battery, C.S.A. - "The Big Guns of Fayette"
City: Schulenburg
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1965
Marker Location: From Schulenburg, take FM 2676 north about 2.3 mile.
Marker Text: Organized in Fayette County, 1861, by Edmund Creuzbaur, a former Prussian artillery officer, and composed of around 150 men, 4 cannon, 72 horses, 39 mules. It served as both light and heavy field artillery at Fort Brown, Sabine Pass and other points in Texas and Louisiana. The unit at Calcasieu Pass, La., May 1864, attacked and captured two Union gunboats. In the 75-minute fight, one ship was hit 65 times; Wm. Kneip was killed; of the wounded, three later died. Capt. Creuzbaur soon after resigned and his brother-in-law, Capt. Charles Welhausen, assumed the command.

The Dawson Expedition/Historic Oak

Marker Title: The Dawson Expedition/Historic Oak
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1963
Marker Location: Corner of Washington & Colorado, La Grange.
Marker Text: It was under this historic oak when the men of Capt. Nicholas Mosby Dawson's company assembled on September 15, 1842 and went to the relief of San Antonio to repel the invasion of Texas by the Mexican Army under Gen. Adrian Woll. In the fight near Salado Creek, September 18, Dawson and 35 of his men were killed, 15 captured and imprisoned in Castle Perote in Mexico, and 3 escaped. Here on the courthouse square, the scarred remains of what was once a mighty oak marks the spot from which La Grange has on every occasion sent its sons to battle. In fights with the Indians, the struggle with Mexico, in the War between the States, the Spanish American War, and in two World Wars, sons of Fayette County were first marshaled under this tree. Wives, mothers, sweethearts here bade farewell and sent their men to battle, each time to win acclaim as true patriots.

Earthman Farm

Marker Title: Earthman Farm
City: La Grange
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1972
Marker Text: Established 1835 with one-room log cabin as settlers' dwelling. In 1841, a party of Indians was alleged to have killed, scalped, and mutilated the body of young Henry Earthman, who was hunting horses (with his brother Fields) near their home. Fields Earthman took the news of the murder to Rutersville College (8 Mi. E), and nearly all boys at school spent the ensuing three weeks hunting fruitlessly for Indians. Present house was built 1877. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark-1972.

Fayette County

Marker Title: Fayette County
City: La Grange
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: Corner of N. College & E. Travis St., La Grange.
Marker Text: Formed from Colorado and Bastrop counties. Created December 14, 1837. Organized January 1, 1838. Named in honor of Marquis de LaFayette. 1757-1834. Nobleman and Republican friend of Washington and of the United States. County Seat, La Grange. (La Grange, US Hy 77 - State Hy 71)

Fayette County Courthouse

Marker Title: Fayette County Courthouse
Address: 151 N. Washington
City: La Grange
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 2001
Marker Location: West lawn of courthouse square
Marker Text: About 1890, the structural safety of Fayette County's third courthouse came into question, and plans began for the building of this structure to serve as the seat of justice for the county. The commissioners court hired San Antonio architect James Riely Gordon (1863-1937) to design the new courthouse and oversee the construction. Gordon, who was 27 years old at the time, went on to become a noted architect of public buildings in Texas. Funding for the 1890-91 courthouse came from the sale of $90,000 in bonds. Martin, Byrnes and Johnston of Colorado City served as building contractors. Gordon designed the courthouse in the Romanesque Revival style and specified four types of native Texas stone to detail the exterior: Blue Muldoon sandstone, Belton White limestone, Pecos Red sandstone and Pink Burnet granite. A central open atrium, designed to promote good lighting and natural ventilation, highlighted the interior space. The extensive use of stone, along with the massive arched windows and doorways, exemplify the building's Romanesque Revival influences. The oldest existing J. Riely Gordon courthouse in Texas, the Fayette County courthouse was completed in 1891. It has served as a setting for social events, celebrations, courtroom dramas and political oratory, and continues as a center of politics and government for the county. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2001

Fayette Heritage Museum and Archives

Museum Name: Fayette Heritage Museum and Archives
City: La Grange
Zip Code: 78945
Street Address: 855 S Jefferson
Area Code: 409
Phone: 968-6418
County: Fayette

Fayetteville

Marker Title: Fayetteville
City: Fayetteville
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: Public Square, Main & Washington, Fayetteville
Marker Text: Stage station on the Old San Felipe Trail founded by James J. Ross, John Crier, James Cummins - members of Austin's first colony. Nearby resided William J. Russell, participant of the Battle of Velasco. Jerome B. Alexander, Fidelie S. Breeding, James Monroe Hill - veterans of San Jacinto. Andrew Crier, William Hill, Dr. William P. Smith of the San Jacinto Campaign. Asa Hill, Jeffery B. Hill, John C. C. Hill - members of the Mier Expedition. (City Hall Square, Fayetteville, Fayette County)

Gotcher Trace

Marker Title: Gotcher Trace
City: La Grange
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: From La Grange take FM 245 NW about 12.5 miles then go NW FM 1291 about 3 miles.
Marker Text: Opened about 1828 by James Gotcher from Alabama, a settler on Rabb's Creek in present Lee County, as route from San Felipe, in Stephen F. Austin's original colony, to Bastrop in second or "little" colony. A short, exposed route to the upper settlements, this trace shared with nearby Wilbarger Trace the title of "via Dolorosa" of early Texas, as both were marked by tragedies. Gotcher moved to this area, and in 1836 six people of his family were killed and several captured during an Indian attack. At this point the trace is crossed by a 20th century road.

Asa Hill of Rutersville

Marker Title: Asa Hill of Rutersville
City: Rutersville
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1973
Marker Location: SH 159, Rutersville.
Marker Text: (1788? - 1844) Born in Martin County, N.C. Married Elizabeth Barksdale in Georgia, Oct. 6, 1808. Came to Texas 1835. In army in 1836, was sent by Gen. Houston to warn people in enemy's path. Settled here 1839. In 1840, enrolled eight children in Rutersville College. With sons Jeffrey and John C.C., joined the 1842 expedition to Mier, Mex.; captured, he drew a white bean thus escaped death, but was in prison until Aug. 1843. Jeffrey was wounded, captured, likewise imprisoned. John C.C., then 14, was adopted by Gen. Santa Anna. Asa Hill died here; was buried on Cedar Creek, off SH 159. Incise on back of marker: In Memory of Jeffrey Barksdale Hill, son of Asa Hill; William Carroll Jackson Hill, son of Asa Hill; James Monroe Hill, son of Asa Hill; Asa Collinsworth Hill, son of Asa Hill; John Christopher Columbus Hill, son of Asa Hill; Lucy Amanda (Hill) Jones, daughter of James Monroe Hill; Frank Webb Hill, son of James Monroe Hill; George Alfred Hill, Jr., grandson of James Monroe Hill; Thomas Lindsay Blanton, great-grandson of Asa Hill

Early Texas Hotels & Inns

Marker Title: Early Texas Hotels & Inns
City: Round Top
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: Town Square, Washington St., Round Top.
Marker Text: Two miles east, at Winedale, is the Old "Sam Lewis Stopping Place" of the 1850s--a typical early Texas inn, now a University of Texas Research Center. Built 1834, as a settler's 2-room log cabin of hand-hewn cedar; then enlarged twice and (with work of local German craftsmen) improved in style, it was home after 1848 to Lewis, his wife, eight children; also entertained guests from passing stagecoaches. It was near roads connecting major Texas cities. Many roadside homes in early Texas were inns. The horseback traveler would shelter his pony in the barn, share family meals and get a room for the night. All stage lines depended on such accommodations-- for changes of horses, for passengers' meals, and for overnight stops. With travel difficult at best, such inns rendered a service of great public necessity. A frontier inn might even be a dugout, where the guests rolled up in blankets and slept on the floor. (Travelers sometimes had to sleep under a tree, so any sort of sheltering house was usually welcomed.) Most stage stops dispatched and received U.S. mail for the community. Towns originated at many stops. In early Texas, famous hotels included the Tremont, Galveston;The Old Capitol, Houston; several in Austin.

Konrad Joh Log Cabin

Marker Title: Konrad Joh Log Cabin
City: Round Top
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1978
Marker Location: From Round Top, take Hwy. 237 South 1 mile then go West on Hartfield Road 1 mile - house is on west side of street.
Marker Text: According to tradition, this cabin was erected about 1848 near the main Galveston to Bastrop Rd. The hand-hewn live oak logs were chinked with a mixture of mud, straw, and sand. Konrad (1830-1912) and Elisa (Zwernemann) Joh (1839-1901), who migrated to Texas from Germany, occupied the structure for many years. In 1875 they used oxen to move the cabin about 300 feet uphill from its original location. Later members of the Paetzold family lived here. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark -

Lyons, Site of Former Town of

Marker Title: Site of Former Town of Lyons
City: Schulenburg
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1972
Marker Location: From Schulenburg, take SH 77 South about .5 miles.
Marker Text: Early town on land grant of Keziah Cryer. Named for settler James Lyons, killed by 1837 Indian raiders, who kidnapped his son Warren. In 1860s town had stores, Masonic Lodge, school, post office; and was on "Cotton Road" to Mexico, but it died in 1870s when the Southern Pacific Railroad was built.

Monument Hill and Kreische Brewery State Historical Parks

Museum Name: Monument Hill and Kreische Brewery State Historical Parks
City: La Grange
Zip Code: 78945
Street Address: 414 State Loop 92
Area Code: 409
Phone: 968-5658
County: Fayette

Moore House, Colonel John H.

Marker Title: Colonel John H. Moore House
City: La Grange
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: Oak Meadows Ranch - from La Grange, take Hwy. 77 1 mile to FM 2145. About 6 miles NW, marker is at ranch headquarters.
Marker Text: This house was built in 1838 as a residence for Colonel John H. Moore and his wife Eliza Cummins Moore. Colonel Moore, a noted Indian fighter commanded the Texians at Gonzales, October 2, 1835 when the first shot of the Texas Revolution was fired.

Robinson, Joseph C.

Marker Title: Joseph C. Robinson
City: West Point
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: Woods Prairie Cemetery, from West Point go west on Hwy. 71 about 1.5 mile to Woods Prairie Cemetery Rd. or County Road 417- follow north about .4 mile.
Marker Text: Captured at the "Dawson Massacre" September 18, 1942. Died in 1861.

Ross, James J.

Marker Title: James J. Ross
City: La Grange
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1985
Marker Location: from La Grange, take SH 71 SE about 10 miles to intersection of Hwy. 71 & FM 955.
Marker Text: Born in South Carolina in about 1787, James Jeffres Ross was a member of the "Old Three Hundred." He arrived in Stephen F. Austin's colony in late 1822 or early 1823, moving onto the league granted him near Eagle Lake in Colorado County. In 1828 he moved to the S. A. Anderson League and built a home about one mile southwest of this site. Col. Ross, as he was known, soon assumed a position of leadership as captain of the militia of the Colorado District. He was a delegate to the second convention at San Felipe in 1833 and was one of those appointed in 1834 to help obtain Austin's release from imprisonment in Mexico. He helped establish a stage line and a stop that became the town of Fayetteville. An important figure during the early years of settlement in this part of the state, Ross was a successful farmer, rancher, trader, and merchant. Ross Prairie and Ross Creek, both in this vicinity, bear his name. He was killed by angry neighbors in January 1835 for sheltering Indians at his home and was buried in nearby Ross Cemetery. His home, which came to be known as the Ross/Martinek House, was owned by Czech immigrant Joseph Martinek and his descendants for nearly seventy years.

Round Top Area History Museum

Museum Name: Round Top Area History Museum
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 151
City: Round Top
Zip Code: 78954
Street Address: 304 N Washington
Area Code: 409
Phone: 249-5058
County: Fayette

Schulenburg Historical Museum

Museum Name: Schulenburg Historical Museum
Mailing Address: 1304 Kellett
City: Schulenburg
Zip Code: 78956
Area Code: 409
Phone: 743-3165
County: Fayette

Texas Pioneer Arts Foundation

Museum Name: Texas Pioneer Arts Foundation
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 82
City: Round Top
Zip Code: 78954
Street Address: Main and Live Oak
Area Code: 409
Phone: 249-3308
County: Fayette

Twin Blockhouse, Site of a

Marker Title: Site of a Twin Blockhouse
City: La Grange
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: 385 N. Main St., La Grange.
Marker Text: Built about 1828; used as a place of defense against the Indians and known as Moore's Fort in honor of its builder and owner, John Henry Moore, 1800-1880, noted Indian fighter and commander of the Texans at the Battle of Gonzales, October 2, 1835. The City of La Grange was established May 17, 1831 on his land.

Winedale Historical Center for American History

Museum Name: Center for American History Winedale Historical Center
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 11
City: Round Top
Zip Code: 78954
Street Address: FM 2714
Area Code: 409
Phone: 278-3530
County: Fayette

Winedale Stagecoach Inn

Marker Title: Winedale Stagecoach Inn
City: Round Top
County: Fayette
Marker Location: From Round Top, take FM 1457 W about 2.5 miles then go NW on FM 2714 1/2 miles.
Marker Text: Built by William S. Townsend about 1834. Of cedar timbers-- one large room, fireplace and loft for sleeping quarters. Purchased in 1848 by Samuel K. Lewis; enlarged to present form. Became known as "Sam Lewis' stopping place" for many years. Restored by Miss Ima Hogg, 1964. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1967.

Wood's Fort, Site of

Marker Title: Site of Wood's Fort
City: West Point
County: Fayette
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: From West Point, take State 71 West about 1.5 mile in to Junction of State 71 & County Road 117 intersection (roadside park)
Marker Text: Used by colonists of this vicinity as a protection against Indian attacks. 1828-1842 fortified residence of Zadock Woods, veteran of the War of 1812. One of the old "Three Hundred" of Austin's colonists. Oldest man killed in the "Dawson Massacre" September 18, 1842.

Colorado Depredations-Story One

February 1837, a party of forty Comanches came into Fayette County taking horses and captives. They killed the Honorable John G. Robison and his brother, Walter. The next day, the judge's son, Joel, a veteran of San Jacinto and famous for having captured Santa Anna, heard of the raiding and went out looking for his father and uncle. He said:

"I had scarcely gone a mile, when, in the open post oak woods I found my father's cart and oxen standing in the road. The groceries were also in the cart. But neither father nor uncle were there. I had now no doubt of their fate. The conviction that they were murdered shot into my heart like a thunder bolt. Riding on a few yards further, I discovered buzzards collecting near the road. My approach scared them away and revealed to my sight the body of my father, nude, scalped and mutilated. I dismounted and sat down by the body. After recovering a little from the shock, I looked around for uncle. I found his body, also stripped, scalped and mangled, about fifty yards from my father's remains."

James J. Ross

The following excerpt is from the book, Savage Frontier, by Stephen L. Moore:

The most serious encounter of 1826 occurred when Tawakoni Indians came into the settlements stealing horse and hunting the Tonkawa Indians they so hated. The Tonkawa name was derived from "They all stay together" but has been translated as "men who eat men." They were also reported to have killed and scalped a Mexican resident while on their depredation. The Indians made their camp in the bed of Ross Creek in present Fayette County near the town that later became La Grange. Captain James J. Ross led thirty-one militiamen out to fight these Indians on April 4, 1826. His party was composed of many future Fayette County settlers, including John J. Tumlinson Jr., John Cryer, and S.A. Anderson. When Ross's men raided the Indian camp, they caught them by surprise. Some of the Indians were dancing around with fresh scalps, while others were parching corn of lying down. Of an estimated sixteen Indians, the Texans killed eight and wounded most of the others.

Moore's Fort
Colonel John Henry Moore Picture
Colonel John Henry Moore

In 1826, John Henry Moore built two blockhouses within what are now the city limits of La Grange. Area settlers were also allowed to use this shelter as a defense against the Indians. Buildings from Moore's Fort have been rebuilt in the nearby community of Round Top.


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