Bowie County Historical Markers

Texas Brazos Trail Region
Map of Bowie County Historic Sites
Markers (click on a topic to jump to that section).
"Ace of Clubs" House | Black Cherry Tree | Bois d'Arc | Old Boston | Bowie County | DeKalb | Ellis, Site of the Texas Home of Richard | Epperson's Ferry, Site of | French in Texas | Harrison Chapel, Cemetery for Old | Hatchel/Barkman Caddo Indian Village | Henry, Francis Marion | Joplin, Scott | McDuffie, Dan LaFayette | Pecan Point Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence | Runnels, Martha Adams | Sanders, Harvey C. | Trammel's Trace
Uncommemorated Sites (click on a topic to jump to that section).
Le Poste Des Cadodaquious

"Ace of Clubs" House

Marker Title: "Ace of Clubs" House
Address: 420 Pine St.
City: Texarkana
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1964
Marker Text: Has 3 groups of octagonal rooms (leaves of a club) opening on a rotunda backed by long rectangular rooms (the Club's stem). Rotunda has a marble mantel, French mirrors and spiral stairway and is topped with 20-foot tower. Built 1884 by J.H. Draughan. Owned since 1894 by Henry Moore family. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1964

Black Cherry Tree

Marker Title: Black Cherry Tree
City: New Boston vicinity
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: 6 miles east of New Boston on US 62 (on U.S. Government reservation)
Marker Text: In early days, source of lumber and shingles. Bark had medicinal use. This was judged the largest black cherry tree in Texas in 1965. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, 1969
Bois d'Arc

Marker Title: Bois d'Arc
City: DeKalb
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: US 82 W of Roy's Cafe
Marker Text: Bois d'Arc was used in early Texas for fences, building foundations, ox-yokes, paving blocks. This 153-year-old tree is Texas champion of the species. (1968)

Old Boston

Marker Title: Old Boston
City: Old Boston
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1966
Marker Location: FM 2149 and SH 8 junction
Marker Text: Established while part of Mexico; to serve plantations on Red River. Mail came horseback from Arkansas. Named for W.J. Boston, first storekeeper. A battalion was formed here to fight in Texas Revolution. First Bowie County Seat, 1841. Large stores surrounded square and two-story brick courthouse. Became educational center with 3 fine private schools. Texas governors Hardin R. Runnels and S.W.T. Lanham have lived here. New Boston (4 mil. N) founded on railroad, 1877. Boston (1 mi. S), exact county center, made county seat 1890, and this became "Old" Boston. (1966)

Bowie County
Marker Title: Bowie County
City: New Boston vicinity
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: 2 mi. east of New Boston on US 82 in roadside park
Marker Text: Original text (1936): In 1836 a part of Red River County. Created December 17, 1840; organized February 1, 1841. Named in honor of James Bowie, 1785-1836; member of Long's Expedition, defender of Texas liberty, a martyr of the Alamo. Old Boston, 1841, Texarkana and New Boston have served as county seat. Replacement text (1971): Named for James Bowie (1799-1836), who fought for Texas freedom from 1819, when he joined the Long Expedition, to 1836-- when he died in defense of the Alamo. Inhabited before 1800 by agricultural Indians, charted 1819 for Anglo-American settlement, this was Red River County land when Texas Republic was founded in 1836. Bowie County was created Dec. 18, 1840; organized Feb. 1, 1841. County seats: DeKalb, Old Boston, Texarkana, and Boston. Forceful citizens joined in beginning railroad construction in 1857. economy is based on agriculture, lumber, manufacturing. Erected by the State of Texas - 1971
DeKalb

Marker Title: De Kalb
City: DeKalb
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1966
Marker Location: at junction of US 82 and FM 2735, DeKalb
Marker Text: Named for Maj. Gen. Johann de Kalb - a hero of the American Revolution - upon suggestion (1836) of David Crockett, a visitor on his way to fight in Texas War for Independence. Other Texas heroes traveling through here were James B. Fannin and Wm. B. Travis. Settled by 1831, when land was given for a public school by Dr. W.H. Boyce, Wm. L. Browning, D.M. Chisholm, Clement R. Johns and Judge (and Dr.) James W. Smith. Site of first college in Bowie County, founded in 1839 and of Ninth Masonic Lodge in Texas, organized 1840. Served as county seat, 1840-1841. On two early stagelines. A stopover for U.S. immigrants to Texas Republic, and 49'ers on way to California gold rush. In 1870's hideouts of train robbers Sam Bass, Jesse James, other notorious characters were nearby. Texas & Pacific Railroad reached here 1876. Site in 1889 of P.S. Ramseur's sawmill which shipped high quality lumber all over United States; to get logs to mill, he built a railroad, traces of which still exist. Although in 1896 and 1923 most of businesses were destroyed by fires, city prospers today. Center of ranching, truck farming, and pulpwood productions. Known as "The Pride of East Texas". (1966)

Ellis, Site of the Texas Home of Richard

Marker Title: Site of the Texas Home of Richard Ellis
City: New Boston
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: 8 mi. north of New Boston in roadside park on SH 8
Marker Text: A Virginian by birth and education, jurist and statesman of Alabama, 1813-1825. Came to Texas, 1825. President of the Constitutional Convention, March 1836, and member of the Congress of the Republic of Texas. Born February 14, 1781; died here December 20, 1846.

Epperson's Ferry, Site of

Marker Title: Site of Epperson's Ferry
City: Maud
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1936
Marker Location: 1 mi. northeast of Maud on US 67
Marker Text: At this crossing, constructed by nature and used by Caddo Indians, early French and Spanish explorers, and travelers over Trammel's Trace. Mark Epperson before 1837 established a ferry used until the construction of a wooden bridge antedating the modern structure erected in 1924.

French in Texas

Marker Title: The French in Texas
City: Texarkana
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1966
Marker Location: just north of Texarkana, Tx. city limits on US 59/71 about 1 mi. north of IH-30
Marker Text: Were explorers and traders for about a century. Claimed coastal Texas early as 1685 when La Salle established his Fort Saint Louis colony. Another Fort Saint Louis, among Nassonite Indians, a few miles northwest of this marker, was founded in 1719 by a French captain, Benard de La Harpe, who came up the Red River. This fort was a center for trade with the Cadodacho (Caddoes) of northeast Texas and the Wichita, Tawakoni, Tonkawa and other tribes of North Texas. Over 250,000 French and Caddo Indian artifacts have been found near here-- including two millstones used in a flour mill near the fort. Although Spain claimed Texas earlier and during the time of La Harpe, this did not discourage the French; they traded as far south as the mouth of the Trinity until Louisiana was ceded to Spain in 1762. The chief French influence in east Texas was the Cavalier Saint Denis (1676-1744), who controlled Red River area of Louisiana, frequently coming into Texas. At first he prospected for silver and gold, as Spain had done. Later he found trading with the Indians was very profitable. The French had no policy against trading guns to Indians; partly for that reason they were more popular than the Spainards. (1966)

Harrison Chapel, Cemetery for Old

Marker Title: Cemetery for Old Harrison Chapel
City: Redwater vicinity
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1968
Marker Location: US 67 about 3 mi. east of Redwater on north side of road
Marker Text: Founded 1840 by Republic of Texas pioneers Charles Moores (1776-1852) and wife, Mary Harrison. Extinct all-faiths chapel, where circuit riders served, named for her parents (of South Carolina). This 5-acre family-community burial plot contains about 100 graves. Mary, Charles Moores, and Willis Whitaker were children of American Revolution soldiers; 3 of Moores' son were Texas Rangers; 4 men buried here had Republic of Texas headrights. Cemetery, restored 1967, is now only evidence of Mooresville (1 mi. N), post office 1841-1866. Moore's Landing was on Sulphur River. (1968) Incise on back: Erected by Cooper Burgess, Moores, Rosborough, Rochelle, Janes, and Whitaker descendants.

Hatchel/Barkman Caddo Indian Village

Marker Title: Hatchel/Barkman Caddo Indian Village
City: Texarkana vicinity
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1981
Marker Location: 2 mi. north of Texarkana on US 59/71 ROW
Marker Text: Near here for 1,000 years, 800-1800 A.D., lived civilized Caddoes, who thought they were the sole survivors of a prehistoric flood and ancestors of all Indians. Their ceremonial mounds stood high above Red River. They had a significant role in exchanges between Puebloan Indians and the Mound-Builders in the east. They domesticated food plants such as corn, squash and beans and manufactured fine pottery. Because of pressure from Euro-American settlers, they left this area, and descendants are found in Oklahoma. Their village site is now under state protection. (1981) Incise in base: Marker sponsored by the Hoblitzelle Foundation

Henry, Francis Marion

Marker Title: Francis Marion Henry
City: Texarkana
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Text: (Dec. 11, 1832 - April 21, 1911) The great great grandson of Patrick Henry; served army of the Confederacy before buying tract in Texarkana about 1873. Captain Henry was elected to Texas Senate in 1876. Built first brick home in city; donated site for Methodist church. A leading city attorney for 34 years, securing wide reputation as trial lawyer. All business firms of Texarkana closed in respect at his death. Recorded, 1967

Joplin, Scott

Marker Title: Scott Joplin
Address: 901 State Line Ave.
City: Texarkana
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1976
Marker Text: (November 24, 1868 - April 1, 1917) Black composer Scott Joplin, often called the "King of Ragtime Music", was born in Texarkana, Texas, five years before the townsite was platted in 1873. His family lived in this vicinity, and he attended nearby Orr School on Laurel Street. His early musical training came from his father, Giles Joplin, an ex-slave who played the fiddle, and mother, Florence Givens Joplin, who played the banjo. By tradition, a German music teacher realized Joplin's talent and gave him lessons. Joplin left home at age 14 and wandered through the midwest entertaining in saloons and honky-tonks. In the 1890s, he was one of the originators of ragtime, a rhythmic new musical form that combined black and white musical traditions. Joplin's "Maple Leaf Rag", published in 1899, launched ragtime as a national fad. Joplin defended ragtime against those who called it frivolous and worked constantly to refine his music, which included over 30 piano rags. Demand for ragtime had declined by 1917, when Joplin died in New York City. Joplin's background is revealed in his most ambitious work, the black folk opera "Treemonisha", set on a plantation "northeast of the town of Texarkana". It was not produced until the 1970s, when a revival of Joplin's music inspired public recognition of his genius. (1976) Incise on back: Texarkana Joint Bicentennial Commission, Bowie County Historical Commission, Jerry L. Atkins, Nick Demopulos

McDuffie, Dan LaFayette

Marker Title: Dan LaFayette McDuffie
City: New Boston
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1967
Marker Location: Reed Hill Cemetery, 1 mi. south of New Boston
Marker Text: (February 16, 1883 - July 7, 1931) Last Ranger killed on duty in East Texas oil boom of 1930's. A third generation enforcement officer; learned methods, skills from an uncle, Texarkana police chief. Held first office at 18. Won fame in 1923 amnesty, when 82 liquor stills were turned in. Spent 30 years as county peace officer, railroad special agent, and Texas Ranger. Known for his fearless courage, integrity. Met death on duty in a kidnapping case, when caught in gunfire. Recorded, 1967

Pecan Point Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence

Marker Title: Pecan Point Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence
City: Hooks
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: Off IH-30 near a Stuckey's "park"
Marker Text: Five of the most prominent delegates to the Constitutional Convention of Texas, held March, 1836, hailed from Pecan Point, in this vicinity. Richard Ellis (an attorney and judge) was chosen president of the meeting and later served four terms in the Senate of the Republic. Collin McKinney (a magistrate) helped draft the declaration and served three terms in the house. A.H. Latimer (an attorney) served two terms. Samuel Price Carson (attorney) became Texas' Secretary of State and with Robert Hamilton (financier) was an agent to the United States. (1969)

Runnels, Martha Adams

Marker Title: Martha Adams Runnels
City: Texarkana
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1969
Marker Location: Rose Hill Cemetery, on Lelia St.
Marker Text: (March 26, 1836 - July 19, 1907) A first lady of Texas. Wife of H.W. Runnels, member of legislature 1857-59. During these years she and husband lived in Governor's Mansion, where she was the official hostess for her bachelor brother-in-law, Gov. Hardin Richard Runnels. Recorded - 1969 Incise on base: Erected by Lone Star Chapter Daughters of American Revolution and Bowie County Historical Survey Committee.

Sanders, Harvey C.

Marker Title: Harvey C. Sanders, C.S.A.
City: New Boston vicinity
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1965
Marker Location: roadside park about 8 mi. north on SH 8 from New Boston
Marker Text: Native of Kentucky. In Civil War, fought at Shiloh, Chickamauga and other battles. After being wounded twice, became a guard at Confederate White House. When Richmond fell on April 3, 1865, was placed in escort for the departing president. Rode 5 weeks toward Florida, where President Jefferson Davis was planning to sail for Mexico to join many other Confederate leaders. (These Southerners intended to regroup an army, march north to Texas and continue their fight for states' rights.) President Davis and his guards were followed by thieves trying to steal the Confederate treasury, the horses and the wagons. The assassination of Abraham Lincoln on April 14 and the offer of a reward of $100,000 caused many adventurers to hunt for President Davis. Just before dawn on May 10, near Irwinsville, GA., Federals captured him and his party, including 2 Texans, Postmaster-General John H. Reagan and Presidential Aide F.R. Lubbock, a former Governor of Texas. Mrs. Davis and children were soon freed, but all the men were imprisoned. Sanders was released in a year. Later he came to Texas and lived near this site after 1887-- honored for years as the last man of the Davis bodyguard. (1965)

Trammel's Trace

Marker Title: Trammel's Trace
City: Texarkana vicinity
County: Bowie
Year Marker Erected: 1965
Marker Location: 2 mi. north of Texarkana on US 59/71
Marker Text: Entered Texas at this point. The 1813 road from St. Louis brought in great numbers of pioneers: Stephen F. Austin, his settlers, Sam Houston, James Bowie, David Crockett and others who died in the Texas Revolution. From here pointed southwest. Crossed the Sulphur at Epperson ferry, going south to Nacogdoches, linking "Southwest Trail" with the King's Highway to Mexico. Surveyed by Nicholas Trammel (born in Nashville, Tenn., 1780; died, LaGrange, Texas, 1852), one of a family of U.S. surveyors and scouts. Mapped many trails, but only this one bears his name. (1965)

Le Poste Des Cadodaquious

This was a French fort built somewhere in Bowie County, possibly before 1700. As the name implies, it was connected with the Caddo Indians with whom the French traded, but there is little other recorded history of the fort.


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