Johnson, Proffitt and Carrollton

 

Reuben Johnson, Ewell Proffitt, and Rias Carrollton, were branding cattle at the old Fitzpatrick Ranch, where the Indians made their early appearance during 1864. About ten o'clock in the morning, July 17, 1867, seventy-five Indians came dashing toward them. The boys succeeded in retreating about three-fourths of a mile, but the young men were soon killed. The raid is often mentioned as the "Elm Creek Raid Number Two," because it resembled in many respects, the Big Young County Raid, of 1864.

After the killing of Reuben Johnson, Ewell Proffitt and Rias Carrollton, five Indians appeared at the Hamby Ranch, and encountered Roland Johnson, Jno. H. Cochran, and Tom Hamby. When these citizens presented their guns, the Indians dashed away, but succeeded in driving off Hamby's horses. Rolland Johnson's family ran down and hid in the same cave that protected them during the Big Young County Raid, of 1864. After causing considerable excitement and stealing several horses, the savages withdrew, leaving the dead bodies of Reuben Johnson, Ewell Proffitt and Rias Carrollton, as a token of peace, and confirmation of the many treaties they had made.

Note: Author personally interviewed: Mann Johnson, Henry Williams, J. B. Terrell, J. M. Peveler, John Marlin, and others, who lived on this section of the frontier at the time.

The above story is from the book, The West Texas Frontier, by Joseph Carroll McConnell.